Posts Tagged ‘TV’


This Week’s Shot of Fresh: Make the Camera Love You, Media Formerly Known as Print, and the Paid App Marketing Microcosm

Friday, March 28th, 2014
flickr user sWrightOsment under CC BY license

flickr user sWrightOsment under CC BY license

Shot of Fresh is our weekly roundup of Fresh Ideas content.

11 Tips for a Successful On-Camera Interview

See that red light? That means you just forgot everything you meant to say. Check out some of Johna Burke’s tips for not only remembering your words, but making them sound good, too.

Print Is Dead, Print Isn’t Dead: The “Chinatown” Scenario of a Shifting Media Model

The whole print is dead/not dead back-and-forth is reminiscent of the Chinatown sister/daughter debacle but with less Jack Nicholson. Maybe the reason we can’t agree on whether or not print is dead or alive is because we say “print” and mean “high-quality, edited journalism.”

Marketing Observations: Why People Pay Ten Dollars for an App

What can you gain from observing why a frugal person would buy a $10 app? A few marketing lessons, including how cost vs. price factors into a decision.

PR Insights From Obama’s “Between Two Ferns” Sit-down

Monday, March 17th, 2014

PR Insights from Obama's Between Two Ferns sit-down Ellis Friedman BurrellesLuce Fresh IdeasYou’ve probably already seen President Obama’s appearance last week on “Between Two Ferns,” the satirical interview show hosted by The Hangover star Zach Galifianakis. There to plug the Affordable Care Act, President Obama got a lot of criticism from most corners of the media – not for his message, but for his choice of medium.

Predictably, a lot of pundits proclaimed that the appearance wasn’t “presidential” or “undermined the office of the president.” But regardless of your politics, any good PR pro would have to admit that the White House followed the top tenets of PR and marketing: know your audience, and reach them where they are.

This particular appearance was aimed at Millennials in an effort to get them to sign up for health insurance through healthcare.gov before the March 31 deadline. The President has been publicly advocating for the ACA for many months, but enrollment among young people has lagged. So what’s any good marketing and PR pro to do when a particular audience segment isn’t responding? Reach them where they are.

Which is why Funny or Die was such a savvy choice of platform; it’s a site with noted success in the 18- to 34-year-old male demographic. A lot of the commentators who didn’t “get it” or didn’t like it were, unsurprisingly, not in the target demographic.

Now that the dust has settled from President Obama’s appearance, let’s look at a few PR and marketing takeaways:

First, it’s OK if your medium isn’t universally appealing. There’s a reason it’s called targeting – every target demographic will respond to different things. President Obama’s team knew they were trying to reach an audience who wants to be entertained and doesn’t watch much live TV, so arranging a spot on a live-aired television show would not have adequately reached the target audience.  The Huffington Post reports that 25 percent of Americans age 18 to 29 saw the video, so perhaps the segment isn’t as large as the White House had hoped for, however it’s possible that that segment hadn’t been reached in other, more traditional channels the White House pursued previously.

Take your brand outside its normal realm to reach an elusive audience segment and freshen the message. Doing something unexpected grabs attention, like Beyonce did with her unannounced, iTunes-only album launch, like Red Bull did with the Stratos Space Jump, or Amazon did with its drone delivery testing video. It also helps to use a different platform to reach your audience, as Vladmir Putin did with a New York Times op-ed. President Obama routinely takes his brand to new platforms, as he did in 2012 with a reddit Ask Me Anything.

A more obvious choice of platform would have been Comedy Central’s The Daily Show or The Colbert Report, but by choosing “Between Two Ferns,” the President’s team opted out of the implicit political vibe on the two news comedy shows. This not only helped reach a different portion of the target demographic, but also freshened the message on a very drawn-out issue.

Don’t define success solely by whether people like you; look at your numbers to see if the medium was a successful platform for your message. Sentiment is an excellent way to measure your media coverage, but it’s not the only indicator of success, especially if you’re looking to increase referrals, sales, or enrollment. Look at other key metrics like traffic increase and numbers of sales or referrals. The President’s spot, despite positive and negative segment, was successful in that the video garnered more than 11 million views and traffic to healthcare.gov jumped 40 percent on Tuesday. Whether it was ultimately successful in increasing enrollment remains to be seen.

Do you think President Obama’s platform was a successful one? How do you adapt your platform to your audience?

PR Tips for Dealing With Digital Journalism from Community Service Public Relations Council

Monday, August 27th, 2012

Flickr Image: atriumIn St. Louis, three web managers/editors from local TV, radio and print media outlets discussed how to create web- and social-friendly content. At this Community Service Public Relations Council (CSPRC) luncheon, the media panelists explained what kind of information they sought for their websites, how they integrated social media, and how nonprofits (and others) could best work with them.

The panelists were:

  • Kelsey Proud, web producer, St. Louis Public Radio, 90.7 KWMU, University of Missouri St. Louis
  • Jill Hampton, web producer, My Neighborhood St. Louis, Fox2now.com, KPLR11.com, STLMoms.com
  • Greg Jonsson, breaking news editor at StLToday.com / the St. Louis Post-Dispatch

After a brief introduction, the panelists talked about how journalism has changed in this digital world, and how public relations professionals could help make their jobs easier.

In the early digital days, there was insistence (in broadcast media) that they must break the news on-air first. That notion is gone. Today, breaking news happens online, followed by a more in-depth vetted story on-air. 

The biggest change of all is that content is now shared across the various platforms. Radio is no longer just audio, TV is no longer just video and, of course, newspapers / magazines are no longer just print.  I like the line one TV station GM used a while back about no longer being a TV station “but rather we are a local news organization that is platform agnostic.”

Some of the panelists’ tips that I found noteworthy for PR pros:

  • Everything needs to be interactive to get the best user experience.
  • Every journalist is now a ‘one-man-band.” For example, radio reporters are learning how to utilize images and/or video to get better exposure.
  • Press releases are still the number one way to share a story with them. Kelsey says, “No matter how much we complain, we ARE grateful for press releases.”
  • Even though they just stated that content is cross-platform shared, a good TV story still needs to be very visual.  Even for radio, online is visual so include image(s).
  • Your press release should point to the organization’s online newsroom for background information and additional details. NOTE:  Keep the online newsroom up-to-date! Jill said her pet peeve is “getting a release, going to the website only to find the last press release was posted over a year ago.”
  • Include links to organization, event, social media profiles, and images.
  • Do NOT include cute graphics, or attach Word documents or hi-res images.  Most won’t open them, and sometimes their email system strips them out so they’ll never see them anyway.  Instead, provide links to your online photo gallery—low res images are just fine for the web. 
  • Keep the information straight-forward. Greg says they have no time for “flowery language.”
  • Finally, yes, it’s okay to alert a journalist to a story via Twitter—just not incessantly.

While none of this advice is revolutionary, I believe it’s important to periodically hear it “from the horse’s mouth.”

PR pros, please share any feedback you’ve received from members of the media. Or, if you are a journalist, please share how your job has changed in the digital era, and what we, as PR pros, can do to make it easier.

What is “SoLoMo” and Why It Matters

Friday, June 1st, 2012

SoLoMo is short for Social-Local-Mobile, referring to the amalgamation of social, local and mobile. It represents the growing trend of targeting consumers based on their current location and is typically designed to be shared via social networks.mobile social local

According to a presentation by Casey Knox at AREA203 Digital, businesses with 100 or more social media fans see an eight percent higher click-through rate and 125 percent higher conversion rates. Her presentation states that one in five searches has local intent and 80 percent of mobile internet users prefer ads locally relevant to them. She also states that 70 percent of all mobile searches result in action within one hour.  Those are some pretty power statistics.

If you’re still not convinced that you need to pay attention to the growing SoLoMo trend, a mobile commerce study performed by BIA/Kelsey indicates, by the year 2015, local search volume via smartphones and tablets will have exceeded that from desktops.  Personally, I’m not sure it will take that long.

In fact, Nielsen and NM Incite published an infographic entitled, “The Most Valuable Digital Customers,” last Fall that shows consumers’ social, local and mobile consumption habits and how these interrelate. Some statistics to note:

  • 66 percent of smartphone users say they access social media from somewhere other than home—at work, in the car, in airports, etc.
  • 38 percent of connected device owners looked up product info for an ad while watching TV on their smartphone or tablet.
  • 62 percent of U.S. adults online used their TV and internet at the same time.
  • 51 percent of social media users say they were influenced by standard web ads on social media sites that show which of their friends liked or followed the advertised brand.
  • Nearly all mobile internet users visit portals.

In a Search Engine Watch post, Lisa Buyer states it well, “Fish where the fish are. Taking your social PR message to the market works best when you take the message to the mobile market.” She goes on to state, “Publicizing events, news, and promotions to the mobile market becomes increasingly important for online marketers and brands. The social revolution is driving a paradigm shift in technology use and online public relations and social media campaigns need to go with the SoLoMo flow.”

The Localeze/15miles fifth annual comScore Local Search Usage Study was recently released and indicates the SoLoMo revolution has begun. As reported by Bulldog Reporter, Jeff Beard, president of Localeze, states “Marketers have a unique, unprecedented opportunity to capitalize on reaching consumers at the right time and in the right forum…”

It seems that SoLoMo can help you bring ultra-precise targeting of your campaigns—allowing you to reach the right people at the right time with the right offer. How are you taking advantage of social-local-mobile for your brand?

In PR and the Media: April 17, 2012

Tuesday, April 17th, 2012

A daily round-up of what’s trending in PR and the Media.

1. Hulu Plus hits 2 Million Subscribers, report says “Hulu Plus had about 1.5 million subscribers in January, and has been averaging about 1 million new subscribers each year. That figure appears to be on the rise.” (CNET)

 

2. Copyright conundrum in Oracle-Google case: Is a computer language fair game? “The final outcome of Oracle-Google trial will determine whether computer programming languages are subject to copyright law.” (CNET)

 

3. NYC Pressures Omnicom For Workplace Diversity “The city’s Office of the Comptroller has asked four holding companies — Omnicom, Interpublic Group, WPP and Publicis — to publicly disclose detailed submissions required by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to show just how diverse — or not — their workforces are.” (MediaPost)

 

4. U.S. Consumers Receptive to Social Media Appearing on Their TV Screens, According to Accenture Study “Social media is showing signs of connecting with TV viewers as nearly two-thirds (64 percent) of U.S. consumers surveyed recall seeing social media symbols such as Facebook “Likes” while watching television, according to an Accenture study.” (MarketWatch)

 

5. NAB: Adobe Study Shows High Online Ad Engagement “Completion rates for mid-roll online ads climb to 87% in second half of 2011.” (Broadcast and Cable)