Posts Tagged ‘tools’


PR Measurement: Beyond Vanity Metrics

Friday, September 23rd, 2016
http://claringtonwatchdog.blogspot.com/2008/05/efw-business-case-rubbish.html.

http://claringtonwatchdog.blogspot.com/2008/05/efw-business-case-rubbish.html

“Sometimes just putting out basic metrics can actually hurt your measurement program and not help management see the true ROI and efforts you are putting in.” That was how Nicole Moreo began this AMEC measurement week webinar.  Well, that certainly got my attention! I thought how can reporting on basic metrics hurt my credibility?  Nicole explains.

Vanity metrics are metrics that feel important but are ultimately superficial, or worse, deceptive. What we usually think of are things like impressions, likes, re-tweets, AVEs (ad value equivalency), share of voice, mentions, page views, etc. They are not performance indicators. While some of these are important for benchmarking purposes, they should not be relied upon for actual intelligence.  In the big picture, vanity metrics actually hold you back.

So, how do we figure out what to measure?  First, Nicole cautioned, resist the urge to run out and subscribe to the latest tool or aggregator service that claims to programmatically measure for you.  She went on to outline the steps PR pros must take—before embarking on a measurement program.

Listen and Ask

Listen to senior management, your team, your clients (internal or external). Ask questions, such as

  • What is the strategic goal of the PR / marketing program, specifically the business goal? You may hear, for example, “increase share of voice” (SOV)—why? Or, “we want to put this message out on social media so people can see it”—why? What is the goal? Are you trying to increase sales? Are you trying to get people to download a whitepaper? How does that tie back to the business goal?
  • Who are the key audiences? Your program is obviously not to every single person in the universe, so precisely who do you want to reach?
  • Which platforms will be effective—based on the answers to the first two questions?
  • What are the internal KPIs (key performance indicators) that are being used? What business point does that tie back to?
  • What is the internal reporting structure?
  • What insights are you hoping for?

Once you have the answers to those questions, you want to use your metrics as a tool to tell a story (after all, that’s what public relations practitioners are good at—storytelling)!

So What?

Start with the basic metrics, like share of voice—but who are you comparing to? Competitors? Other divisions within the company? Ensure what you are comparing is apples to apples.  Engagement is also a basic metric that allows you to know how many people are actually interacting with your content and potentially have the influence to share it. Tonality (sentiment) is another that you may opt to use and there are others but start with these basics.  Then, ask again, so what? That may lead you to another point, where you once again ask, so what? Nicole recommends asking this three times will help you find the answers that offer a mix of qualitative explanations and quantitative variables.

She went on to offer specific examples, showing charts and graphs  sharing how each of them created a story of insights and intelligence that were meaningful and actionable. This was all possible by asking the right questions before embarking on the program.

Please feel free to add your own thoughts or experiences here in the comments section, and continue to check back here for more AMEC PR measurement tips from the experts!

Don’t Be a Tool: a Guide to the Latest Social Media Tools (BurrellesLuce Webinar Recap)

Monday, October 15th, 2012

Nearly every month yet another social media measurement tool appears on the horizon, promising to bring better insights, increased efficiency, and better performance. All too often PR and marketing professionals yield to “social media shiny tool syndrome.”

This was the topic of a recent webinar by BurrellesLuce and Brad B. McCormick, principal at 10 Louder Strategies, “Don’t Be a Tool: A Guide To the Latest Social Media Tools.” Click here to view the on-demand recording of the presentations.

Tips for Getting the Most Out of Your Social Media Tools

McCormick suggests the following tips to avoid social media shiny tool syndrome.

  • Make sure it is a tool you really need.
  • Select the right tool for the job.
  • Training and practice are essential.
  • Not all tools are created equal.
  • Take the integral view of revenue. (ROI is where paid, owned, earned intersect.)

A List of Social Media Tools
There are a variety of social media tools available for listening, influencer identification, notification, monitoring and management, measurement. Most times you get what you pay for; however, a more expensive tool doesn’t always guarantee that it will deliver better results. McCormick suggests choosing from the following free and paid tools:

What do you think of these tools? Which others would you add to the list?

SAVE THE DATE- UPCOMING PRODUCT DEMONSTRATION WEBCAST
Thursday, October 18, 2012 @ 2:00pm EDT.

Join Tressa Robbins of BurrellesLuce and Jack Monson of Engage121 for this informative product demonstration of the BurrellesLuce social media monitoring tool (Engage121).

Complimentary BurrellesLuce Webinar: Don’t Be A Tool: A Guide To The Latest Social Media Tools

Friday, October 5th, 2012

Complimentary BurrellesLuce Webinar: Don't Be a Tool: A Guide to Social Media ToolsComplimentary BurrellesLuce Webinar: “Don’t Be A Tool: A Guide To The Latest Social Media Tools”

When: Tuesday, October 9, 2012.

Time: 1 p.m. EDT

REGISTER NOW!

Nearly every month yet another Social Media Measurement tool appears on the horizon, promising to bring better insights, increased efficiently, and better performance. But do all these tools really live up to the hype? Are these tools all they are cracked up to be? Which ones are really worth looking at? Are paid tools necessarily better than free ones?

Join BurrellesLuce and Brad B. McCormick, principal at 10 Louder Strategies for an informative 60-minute webcast, “Don’t Be A Tool: A Guide To The Latest Social Media Tools,” where these questions and others will be answered.

During the webinar you will learn:

  • About the Social Media Shiny Tool Syndrome
  • 4 steps to avoid the trapping of Social Media Shiny Tool Syndrome
  • A rundown of the best free and paid tools for listening, influencer identification, monitoring and management, and conversion tracking
  • Tips to help ensure you get the most out of new and existing tools

REGISTER NOW!

Moderator:

Johna Burke, senior vice president, marketing, BurrellesLuce

Space is limited. Sign up now for this free webinar, “Don’t Be A Tool: A Guide To The Latest Social Media Tools.” If we are unable to accept your registration, an on-demand presentation will be available for review after the event at www.burrellesluce.com.

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Brad B. McCormick (@darbtx), is principal at 10 Louder Strategies. He has over 13 years of global agency experiencing leading teams in the creation of award-winning, integrated campaigns. His team’s work has been recognized by Communication Arts, the Webby Awards, SXSWi and the One Show. Brad has been quoted in the New York Times and Business Week and has written for both PRWeek , which has named him one of four “Top Digital Creative Minds” in 2008, and Ad Age.

2012 Social Media Trends from IABC DC Metro

Monday, January 30th, 2012

Even though we know digital and online media continues to change, IABC/DC Metro started 2012 with a chapter meeting tackling the latest Social Media Trends.

The panelists included:

Emerging Social Media Trends
Each panelist brought different industry point-of-view to the discussion. Radick took government. Horowitz gave the agency perspective, Steigman reviewed the small business view and Dunham brought insight from publishing and the media.

  1. Government Use: Radick dispelled the myth that the government is behind the curve, but he did see them stalling in advances for 2012 because it is an election year.
  2.  Internal Communications: Radick also thinks there will be more enterprise 2.0 or social media behind the firewall to internal audiences.
  3. Integrated Efforts: Both Radick and Horowitz confirmed they see more integration into all lines of communications.
  4. Influencers: They felt the days of the “social media guru” are dying fast. Horowitz said it’s time to look for persuaders or influencers who can help persuade others to your thinking or agenda.
  5. Small Business: Steigman sees social media platforms as a reliable ecosystem and wonders how they can be used to make it easier to reach customers. She suggested reading Phil Simon’s The Age of the Platform: How Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google Have Redefined Business. She also feels it will be key for business to understand search and the data around it.  
  6. Digital Skills: Dunham is amazed by the use of tablets for tweeting, video, etc. Because many of his colleagues are not digitally inclined, he relies on interns to provide new ideas for using social media to drive more readers to their media properties.  

Social Media Best Practices for 2012
As with all social media discussions, some great best practices come out. Radick reminded us, “Don’t concentrate on social media tools, but concentrate on the principles behind them.

“When asked how to best measure social media, Horwoitz said, “You need to measure based on business goals, don’t measure on tactics.”  

For more helpful social media best practices, you can read Steigman’s highlights of the session on her blog.

What social media trends do you see for 2012? Please share them with the BurrellesLuce Fresh Ideas readers.  

PRSA-NCC: The Changing Landscape of Social Media

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2011

“I don’t know what Facebook is going to look like a week from now because, you know, we move pretty fast,“ said Andrew Noyes, public policy communications, Facebook, at the National Capital Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America’s (PRSA-NCC) event on the Changing Landscape of Social Media. The tools we use now are ever changing and new tools and platforms are always emerging.

Panelist Ricky Choi, social media strategist for LivingSocial, reminded the audience, “Social media should be visual, personal and conversational.” He noted that social media will be a better marketing tool than email in three to five years and that social media engagement is the sum of interaction and content. Communicators should try to include context without being salesy.

The evolution of the media is happening, but questions remain regarding the best way to translate personal use to the big picture, Noyes reiterated. Choi suggested more education as one possible solution. Facebook is trying to educate younger users on how to be good digital citizens and understand that reputation is important. The social media giant is working with outside thought leaders to encourage people to use their privacy settings effectively. (more…)