Posts Tagged ‘Shira Sky’


Top Insider Tips to Pitch National Broadcast Shows

Monday, September 29th, 2014
Top Insider Tips to Pitch to National Broadcast Shows BurrellesLuce Fresh Ideas Alfred Cox media outreach media pitching media monitoring

flickr user A DeVigal under CC BY

by Alfred Cox*

Have someone you want to be a guest on a nationally-broadcast television show? Then there are a lot of things to keep in mind when you’re pitching producers. Last week I attended PRSA-NY’s Meet the Media: National Broadcast event that brought together four producers of national broadcast programs to give their advice to public relations pros.

The panelists were:

Tommy Crudup, senior talent executive at Rachael Ray

Todd Polkes, coordinating producer at The Meredith Vieira Show

Shira Sky, host and executive producer at HuffPost Live

Cheryl Strick, director of talent relations at Talk Stoop

Here are some highlights from the event.

On how they’d like to be pitched

All panelists agreed that they want to be pitched by email. Crudup said no phone follow-ups – they won’t respond at all. Polkes wants email pitches that include links and/or clips of potential guests on shows of similar formats, and Sky requested that the most pertinent info go in the subject line as well as a bio and links to interviews.

The panelists also discussed some no-nos: don’t, said Crudup, send a three-page pitch, and don’t tell producers what they should talk about; that’s their decision. Sky doesn’t want to have to ask to describe what you’re trying to pitch, and if she has to Google, she’s not a happy camper. Strick doesn’t want to hear just about what a guest is doing now, she wants to hear what they’ve done in the past.

Perhaps most important is that you know the show and their audience. Know the kinds of guests the show has had in the past, and stay up-to-date with what they’re doing.

On exclusives

Crudup says since they’re a new show, they are looking to book exclusive guests, but their most important criteria is that a guest is fun. On the other hand, Sky says they don’t like exclusives and that they want people who resonate with their audience and have a lot of talent. For taped shows, exclusives aren’t always an optin, Strick acknowledges, but the guest must be someone big or represent something big.

On paid spokespersons

Of the panelists, only Strick’s show accepts paid integration, but she stressed it must be organic and related to Talk Stoop. Sky said they have no regulations about paid spokespersons, but they do have a “resource wall” where they will plug websites or links you bring, but they will not post products.

Crudup and Polkes both said no to paid spokespersons, though Polkes said they will mention a campaign but not a product, as that’s too much advertising.

On social media

All panelists agreed that social media is an integral part of the show’s success, and that it’s just as crucial for guests to be active social media participants as well. Sky says that community and fan engagement is huge for their show, so a guest with a large and/or devoted following is a huge bonus. Crudup wants guests with about two million social media followers and they expect the guest to tweet about the upcoming appearance.

Strick says they will personally tweet before the guest comes on, and Polkes says they can’t have a great show without social media and that tweets are essential to their ratings. So when you’re pitching, be sure to include how active a potential guest is on social media and highlight their influence and following in the initial pitch.

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Bio: Alfred Cox is a rare commodity of a performer who combines a relentless drive to succeed with the ability to provide “first-person” touch to his clients, creating loyalty and repeat business. He has a hard-nosed work ethic in a results- driven environment and he is often called the “Network King.” Alfred has been in the PR industry for the past 18+ years and joined the BurrellesLuce team in 2011. Connect with him on Twitter: @shantikcox Facebook: BurrellesLuce LinkedIn: Alfred Cox

 

8 Tips for Successfully Pitching to Broadcast Media

Friday, October 4th, 2013

PR tips for pitching broadcast media producersAlfred Cox*

Securing a spot on national broadcast media is the ultimate in media placement, but successfully pitching to get a client into one of those broadcast spots is competitive and challenging. This year’s PRSA-NY annual broadcast pitching event, Meet the Media: National Broadcast Media, featured a panel of four prominent broadcast media producers to explain how to successfully pitch to broadcast and what they look for when filling guest spots.

The panel members were:

Jevon Bruh, talent producer for The Chew (ABC-TV)

Tracy Langer Chevrier, VP/executive producer for The Better Show (Meredith Video Studios)

Kristen Scholer, producer at CNBC

Shira Sky, host and executive producer at Huffington Post Live

Here are some of the tips they gave for successful broadcast pitching.

Pitch by email

Don’t pitch by phone, and unless someone has made known it’s acceptable, never pitch by social media. “Don’t send me a blog or a tweet, social media does not catch my attention,” says Scholer. Send your pitch by email and “Only email once,” she continues. “If you email me twice, you will get no response.”

Do a lot of homework

Be very familiar with the show you’re pitching. Look into what they’ve covered recently and decide if it’s the appropriate time to pitch your story. If you’re pitching a network, know their shows and tailor your pitch to the show you’re pitching.

Include a video clip

Accompanying a pitch must be a video clip. Don’t tell producers to visit a website for a video; enclose the video as a link or as an attachment, but make sure that either is in the correct format. Scholer advises checking the show’s website for the appropriate video format specifications.  Bruh recommends sending copyrighted videos, not web clips, as the copyrighted videos are approved by the stations or network for internal use.

Pitches need to be very relevant

Broadcast media want the story that’s breaking now. “Pitch me the hottest story of the moment,” says Chevrier. Last month’s hot topics won’t cut it.

Pitch an exclusive

A producer is much more likely to accept a pitch if you’re only pitching it to them. “We want exclusives,” says Scholer. “Don’t send us someone who was just on Bloomberg.” However, Chevrier says sometimes they will do follow-ups from other networks.

Guests need TV experience and personality

The last thing producers want is a guest who will bomb on camera, so producers need to see that guests are successful in front of the lens. They also need to know that the guest is both interesting and knowledgeable. “The guest must have a personality,” says Sky. “Give me a reason why I should choose your client. They should be well-spoken and look great.”

Celebrities must be credible

If your client is a celebrity or an athlete representing a product, that star had better be knowledgeable about the product industry, says Chevrier. If a celebrity doesn’t know their stuff, it makes the network look bad, so producers will review the material and the celebrity’s credentials until they are sure they are credible.

Multiple appearances are rare

“We will only have repeated guests who have boosted our ratings,” says Bruh, and if your client is invited back, six months is too soon. Networks will also ask back guests who are extremely knowledgeable, photogenic, and/or who do quality work.

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Bio: Alfred Cox is a rare commodity of a performer who combines a relentless drive to succeed with the ability to provide “first-person” touch to his clients, creating loyalty and repeat business. He has a hard-nosed work ethic in a results- driven environment and he is often called the “Network King.” Alfred has been in the PR industry for the past 18+ years and joined the BurrellesLuce team in 2011. Connect with him on Twitter: @shantikcox Facebook: BurrellesLuce LinkedIn: Alfred Cox

Don’t pitch by phone, and never by social media . “Don’t send me a blog or a tweet” when pitching, says Scholer. “Social media does not catch my attention.”– it won’t catch a producer’s attention. Send your pitch by email and “Only email once,” says Scholer. “If you email me twice, you will get no response