Posts Tagged ‘Old Spice’


How PR Pros Can Define the Future of Public Relations

Friday, November 1st, 2013

Brian Solis BurrellesLuce What is the Future of PR Business What’s the future of PR? What’s the future of business? Is it a bit too early in the morning to consider those questions? It’s a big topic without a clear answer, but at this year’s PRSA International Conference, which ran October 26-29 in Philadelphia, Brian Solis, principal analyst at Altimeter and forward-thinking PR guru, gave a rousing keynote speech to open this year’s conference, which I attended.

Solis’ topic: What is the Future of Business? Or, as he calls it, WTF. The important thread throughout his address was that to evolve the PR profession to suit the ever-changing topography of business and media, it’s up to PR practitioners to put the “relations” back into “public relations.” “This is a time to lean forward, to try something new, to try something different in your approach. In order to do that, we have to first see what it is we don’t do right in order to change and innovate,” Solis advises.

Solis thinks PR pros can rethink their approach to writing and marketing. “We’re still broadcasting at people, marketing at people, and in an era of social media, we’re actually kind of antisocial,” he points out at the beginning of his speech. “Without understanding social science, without aligning with a bigger mission or vision with what we are trying to do, we are just managing [our] businesses the way we always have. We aren’t moving in any new direction.”

Solis asserts that it’s time to challenge our organizational ecosystems and use social media to reinvent PR by making relationships matter again. Approach your social media and marketing strategy from the perspective of your audience. As Solis points out, “they have to go through a journey with your organization, and PR should redefine the whole journey and experience.”

He asks us to consider the ART – the Actions, Reactions, and Transactions – of social media. If a member of your audience is going to give you their attention for a moment, what do you want to do with it? Solis uses the example of Old Spice, a brand he associated with his grandfather, and a brand he never considered using – until Old Spice’s funny viral video campaigns. “Old Spice made the brand relevant for a consumer who would have never thought to use their products. Think about where you can introduce emotional value,” says Solis.

Solis presents his Hybrid Theory, which puts PR at the center of influence, engagement, content marketing, and consumer experience. Through all of these, PR pros can directly engage. In what Solis calls an “ecosystem of accidental narcissists,” your audience has an audience, with whom they only share things relevant to their audience, and that audience will do the same, so it’s important to understand not only your audience, but what will make your audience share with theirs.

Solis asserts that marketing doesn’t come down to the Millennial generation versus the non-Millennial generation; a Boomer with a tablet and a smartphone will exhibit the same behaviors as a Millennial, so it’s time to approach these behaviors as a widespread lifestyle. To thrive in future business, PR pros must figure out how to be part of that lifestyle of connectedness and engagement.

We must also understand how people make decisions. Connected customers don’t go to Google to make their decisions – they go to their network for trusted recommendations. People share their experiences and in the end, it doesn’t matter what your brand promise is – it matters what your brand experience is, and how clients share that experience. “Brands are dying because they fail to realize that customer experiences or opportunities to improve experiences are the future” of successful campaigns, warns Solis.

“The future of PR lies in creating shareable experiences; it starts with a vision, a mission, and a purpose,” he continues. “You have a role in changing how businesses, organizations and governments talk, relate, and influence.” And this change isn’t about tools, technology, blogging, or influencers, it’s about behavior, “What people feel, do, share, like and don’t like. It’s about you and me. And that’s why PR has to change,” says Solis.

Solis suggests defining your purpose and vision to start. Think about your customers, how you communicate with them and how they communicate with each other, and consider what’s important to them. Then, think about how to earn relevance and keep earning relevance.

Solis ended his insights with thoughts on change: “We all talk about change but we never talk about how to change ourselves. It starts with us and how we value the work we do and the impact our work has. There will always be a new platform or device; how do you make those things better? Use technology to bring your vision to life rather than using new technology to do what you’ve done –talk at people.”

As a former journalist who joined the BurrellesLuce team just two months ago, I found Solis’ heavy use of jargon left me feeling a bit talked at. He raised a few points that gave me some new perspectives to consider as I make my way in a new industry, but I also wondered whether relevance is a commodity that can be earned or an ever-changing state of interaction with clients and audience. In looking at our team at BurrellesLuce, I find that we achieve relevance through constant interaction, and dare I say engagement, to stay relevant in their space and in ours.

Discovery – Using Social Media to Drive Social TV Experiences

Friday, March 2nd, 2012

Today’s TV now needs to be “social TV,” where the online experience allows viewers to share their experiences with other viewers and the world. Fans no longer have to wait to discuss the latest episode at the water cooler the next day; they are doing it in real-time and all the time.  

Discovery Communications’ main social media strategy is engagement says Gayle Weiswasser, vice president, social media communications, during an American Marketing Association’s Washington, DC (AMADC) chapter program in January. Additionally, Discovery looks to build community, drive fans to tune-in, increase website page-views, and gather insights.

Most social media strategies contain the big three platforms, Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, but not all platforms are right for every organization. For Discovery, YouTube and GetGlue are also essential platforms. It even started a Pinterest page for TLC because TLC shows are very visual and tend to attract a lot of female fans. As quoted from this Desert News article, “If you’re an American and you know about Pinterest, chances are you’re either female or someone who heard about Pinterest from a female – because no fewer than 83 percent of Americans using Pinterest are female.”   

(For tips on adding Pinterest to your integrative communications efforts, check out this BurrellesLuce newsletter: Understanding Pinterest and Your Audience and my BurrellesLuce colleague Tressa Robbins recent post about Pinterest and how companies and the media are using the site.)

Tips for Creating Social Experiences to Enhance TV Fan Bases

  1. Give fans exclusive content. This is a great way to drive engagement, Weiswasser says. Discovery offers additional scenes and other insights as rewards for comments and sharing. The content is usually only available for a limited time and is not available during the broadcast time for the show it promotes.
  2. Use multiple platforms to interact with your audiences. Weiswasser suggested making “co-viewing” apps available on multiple platforms to promote a linear TV experience for user who following the conversation on a number of different social networks.
  3. Think before you post. Weiswasser tells her team to ask, “If I were a viewer/fan, would I really like this post?” If the post is mediocre, she says it’s best not to post.
  4. Be aware of trends and hot topics. A great way to gain some momentum for your organization is to embrace the culture at the moment.  Animal Planet, for its show “Hillbilly Handfishin’” tweeted, “@OldSpice & @FabioOldSpices – Are Either of You Brave Enough to Try Noodlin’? We Triple Dog Dare You!” Both of Old Spice’s spokespeople, Isaiah Masufa and Fabio took the dare for a couple of fun April Fool’s Day jokes on YouTube.
  5. Increase outreach success by having (celebrity) spokespeople interact with your communities. When Clinton Kelly of “What Not to Wear” took over the show’s Facebook page, they had the most activity in eight years.

Some other great takeaways from Weiswasser:

  • Give the social media team authority to make real decisions.
  • Listen and talk to fans.
  • Build on the engagement you’ve made.
  • Accept that not all audiences are alike.

What lessons have you learned from your social media fans? How do you encourage more engagement? Which new social networks are you adding to the mix?

How to Use Social Media to Save on Holiday Gifts

Wednesday, December 7th, 2011

by Ruth Mesfun*

I love the holiday season! During the month of December, I revert to a nine year old, anticipating the slew of holiday traditions upon us. First, my family assembles the fake pine-like tree in our living room. (Well, my father assembles the tree while I read the directions.) Then, my siblings and I decorate it until it looks like a personalized Santa’s beacon with every light blinking.

One of my favorite parts of the holiday is gift-giving. However this year it seems like more of a financial burden than fun. Brands seem to understand this and are incorporating humor into social media holiday campaigns. Old Spice and its MANta Claus One Man, Seven Billion Gifts campaign is one example.

 

While a far cry from seven billion gifts, here is how I am using social and online media to spread a little holiday cheer while spending only $43 on presents for four family members, three awesome friends, two roommates, and one cat.

1.       Craigslist. I love Craigslist for vintage and technology. I found a quality, fully-functional vintage record player for free. It just needed a little TLC, and my father (whose record player broke) would love this. ($200 value). I also received 30 vinyl records, which I am giving half to my dad and the other half to my roommate who equally loves vinyl – potentially saving $20 on gift for said roommate.

Remember to check if it works before paying and to ensure the seller is legit. Also, make sure you know what your receiver wants. There is no use getting something for free if no one wants or needs it.

Spent: $0

2.       Groupon. I love Groupon for trips, beauty/spa deals, events, and classes. But we all know how addicting Groupon was when we first signed up and started buying all those Groupons that we thought we would use, but probably won’t. Now we can put them to good use. I have six random Groupons from a day spa to belly dancing. I am giving a Groupon to my sister, mom, and two of my friends. ($800 value).

Again, before giving random Groupons to people (unless you don’t care and will never see them again) make sure you know they will actually like the gift.

Spent: $0

3.       Marshalls. Marshalls is great to buy name brand for less. I bought an adorable jewelry box set for my other roommate and a mouse toy for the cat. 

Spent: $10

4.       eBay. I bought a miniature doll tea set for my best friend who loves all things miniature. eBay is a smorgasbord, if you know what you want this site is loaded with deals.  

Spent: $10

5.       Barnes and Noble. I love my brother and he loves Legos. So, with my sister’s help we split the difference for the LEGO 2011 Architecture White House and received a 10 percent  discount because I am a member.  

Spent: $23

The best part is that my friends and family are getting something that they always wanted.

What other ways have you used social and online media to saved money or to promote your products and services during the holidays?

***

Bio: Before joining the BurrellesLuce team in 2011, as social media specialist, Ruth worked as a marketing assistant in a kitchen design firm and, later interned with Turner Public Relations. She holds a BA in Economics with a minor degree in International Relations from Rowan University. In addition to economics, education, and finance – Ruth is passionate about understanding the business implications of social media, including how it can be used to increase ROI, find and maintain a career, and create a business. Connect with her on Twitter: @RuthMesfun LinkedIn: Ruth Mesfun Facebook: BurrellesLuce 

Social Media and Traditional Media Working Together

Monday, October 25th, 2010
Flickr Image:

Flickr Image: lumaxart

Social media and traditional media coverage can work together to give you great media coverage and business results. At the Powering Progress: 2010 PRSA International Conference in Washington, DC last week, Michael McDougall, Bausch & Lomb, Catherine Dunkin, The Standing Partnership and Nicole Ravlin, PMG Relations, presented case studies and personal experiences backing this statement.

Example 1: The lively interactive hour included several examples and ideas for gaining coverage for clients. A recent well-known example is the Old Spice campaign, where Isaiah Mustafa, Old Spice pitchman, answers Twitter and Facebook questions via videos. The videos were timely and funny, and lead to huge amounts of mainstream media coverage.

Example 2: Many people were shocked last year, when Pepsi announced they would not advertise during the Super Bowl. Instead, they agreed to donate the money to charities, and the public could nominate and vote on where the money should go.  The Pepsi Refresh Project garnered Pepsi massive coverage via social media buzz, which lead to mainstream media coverage.

Example 3: Vermont maple syrup and bacon seller Dakin Farm has been able to trace the ROI to their social media posts. They started with a blog and then moved to video. Recorded with a Flip camera, the videos on their YouTube channel and their blog have significantly increased bacon sales. Ravlin suggested using these kinds of videos to show the broadcast media producers the camera-readiness of your spokesperson.

Example 4: As I’ve discussed previously on the BurrellesLuce Fresh Ideas blog, incorporating geo-location social media into a campaign is new and a struggle for some organizations. But Boloco, a regional burrito restaurant chain, successfully used Foursquare to drive business and gain print and broadcast coverage. Each location’s “mayor” was given a VIP card good for prizes. If a new mayorship is awarded, Boloco invited both the incoming and outgoing mayors to lunch for handing over the VIP card. The promotion drew the attention of local newspapers and TV stations, which lead to increased traffic and sales.

Boloco’s CEO John Pepper blogs tweets for the company and responds personally to customers on Twitter. PMG Relations often refers reporters to his blog to get an idea of his personality and philosophy. The panelists commented on the importance of getting executive buy-in for any successful social media campaign.

How are you using social media to help you drive coverage in mainstream media? Do you have any suggestions or tips?