Posts Tagged ‘Internet’


What is “SoLoMo” and Why It Matters

Friday, June 1st, 2012

SoLoMo is short for Social-Local-Mobile, referring to the amalgamation of social, local and mobile. It represents the growing trend of targeting consumers based on their current location and is typically designed to be shared via social networks.mobile social local

According to a presentation by Casey Knox at AREA203 Digital, businesses with 100 or more social media fans see an eight percent higher click-through rate and 125 percent higher conversion rates. Her presentation states that one in five searches has local intent and 80 percent of mobile internet users prefer ads locally relevant to them. She also states that 70 percent of all mobile searches result in action within one hour.  Those are some pretty power statistics.

If you’re still not convinced that you need to pay attention to the growing SoLoMo trend, a mobile commerce study performed by BIA/Kelsey indicates, by the year 2015, local search volume via smartphones and tablets will have exceeded that from desktops.  Personally, I’m not sure it will take that long.

In fact, Nielsen and NM Incite published an infographic entitled, “The Most Valuable Digital Customers,” last Fall that shows consumers’ social, local and mobile consumption habits and how these interrelate. Some statistics to note:

  • 66 percent of smartphone users say they access social media from somewhere other than home—at work, in the car, in airports, etc.
  • 38 percent of connected device owners looked up product info for an ad while watching TV on their smartphone or tablet.
  • 62 percent of U.S. adults online used their TV and internet at the same time.
  • 51 percent of social media users say they were influenced by standard web ads on social media sites that show which of their friends liked or followed the advertised brand.
  • Nearly all mobile internet users visit portals.

In a Search Engine Watch post, Lisa Buyer states it well, “Fish where the fish are. Taking your social PR message to the market works best when you take the message to the mobile market.” She goes on to state, “Publicizing events, news, and promotions to the mobile market becomes increasingly important for online marketers and brands. The social revolution is driving a paradigm shift in technology use and online public relations and social media campaigns need to go with the SoLoMo flow.”

The Localeze/15miles fifth annual comScore Local Search Usage Study was recently released and indicates the SoLoMo revolution has begun. As reported by Bulldog Reporter, Jeff Beard, president of Localeze, states “Marketers have a unique, unprecedented opportunity to capitalize on reaching consumers at the right time and in the right forum…”

It seems that SoLoMo can help you bring ultra-precise targeting of your campaigns—allowing you to reach the right people at the right time with the right offer. How are you taking advantage of social-local-mobile for your brand?

Top BurrellesLuce Fresh Ideas Posts in 2011 – Numbers 20 to 11

Thursday, December 29th, 2011

iStock_000010469879XSmallAs 2011 winds to a close, no year would be complete without a wrap-up list of some kind. In that spirit, we are counting down the 20 Top BurrellesLuce Fresh Ideas posts in 2011. In today’s post we will be highlighting numbers 20 to 11.

Did your favorite Fresh Ideas posts make the list? Be sure to leave a comment and let us know.

20. The Art of Storytelling

19. PRSSA National Conference Speed Networking PR Student Questions

18. How to Speak C-Suite

17. Disappearing Act: 10 Brands That May Not Be Around in 2012

16. The New York Women in Communications 2011 Matrix Awards

15. When a Hashtag Leads to Help: PR Tips from #BlueKey

14. Zappos, 24/7 Customer Service in the Internet Age

13. Oscar’s Social Media Fever

12. Snooki’s Appearance at Rutgers – Good PR or Poor Reputation Management?

11. Poll Results: Should PR Interns Pitch the Media?

Google Reinvents TV: YouTube Ad-Supported ‘Channels’ Bring Internet Television Closer to Reality

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011
WordPress Image: SierraAshley
WordPress Image: SierraAshley

How much exposure does one person need? I have my own Facebook page to post personal updates and photos and my own Twitter handle to speak my mind in “real time” — so why not a 24-hour “TV” channel, aka “The Harry Grapenthin Channel,” dedicated to my content (or lack thereof)?

As frightening and ridiculous as this sounds, Google continues to work hard at making this a reality (no pun intended). Rewriting the rules of television, Google has made it vividly clear how it intends to pursue its piece of the TV advertising pie. As a follow up to Google TV, the search engine giant recently announced it will be offering a software package that allows you to search the Internet for interesting things to watch and plans to launch 100 new advertising supported “channels” for its YouTube online video service, confirms The Economist. (Madonna, Shaquille O’Neill, and Jay-Z are some of many celebs already signed up to provide professional content). Just when we thought there were too many channels on cable TV, a channel per person or topic could mean millions more popping up on the Internet.

But what about live sports you ask? Google has that covered too. In fact, last month Google dipped its toes in the “live sports” waters for the first time when it announced the future launch of seven sports channels, including one that will feature programming from Major League Soccer. “What you’re seeing is a bit of a tip of the iceberg, explains Brian Bedol, a cable industry veteran who founded Classic Sports Television in 1995, in this Sports Business Daily article. “This is where the young male demographic gets more and more of its entertainment. If you’re in sports, you need to be looking at how you’re delivering sports over the Internet.”

Whether we get our television from networks, cable providers, satellite providers, online providers or “fill in the blank” – one thing remains the same, television content, as we know it today, continues to be in high demand and still commands huge advertising dollars … whether this continues remains to be seen. However, Google is betting that it does.

Privacy on the Internet: What Every Communicator Should Know

Tuesday, September 20th, 2011
Flickr Image: o5com

Flickr Image: o5com

Privacy laws remain the same, even in electronic mediums. Many organizations think the rules might be different, but actually the same rules apply. This was a key point from the National Capital Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America’s (PRSA-NCC) September 13 professional development panel.

The expert panel included:

Brigitte Johnson, PRSA-NCC president and director of communications and executive editor at American Forest Foundation
Randy Barrett, communications director, Center for Public Integrity
Justin Brookman, director, Consumer Privacy Project, Center for Democracy & Technology
Christian Olsen, vice president for the Digital and Social Media team at Levick Strategic Communications

All the panelists reminded the audience about the importance of being transparent regarding who you are representing when pitching online media.

Barrett commented on the concerns of media and journalists. Media outlets try to avoid the appearance of any kind of bias and ask their journalists to be careful of whom they “like” on Facebook. Journalists should also always identify themselves when on social media, verify all social media leads and remember social media posts are discoverable in court.

Always disclose who is behind a post, because transparency is key says Brookman. He recommended looking at why and how much secondary data you might be collecting and be sure to disclose how it will be used. You should try to avoid unnecessary collection. He used the example of mobile apps, which can often have access to all the data on the phone. Olsen agreed and commented on how he removed the Facebook app from his smartphone, because he thought Facebook went too far when his entire address book of phone numbers imported to his Facebook account.

Public relations professionals have an obligation to counsel clients on how to be transparent in social media. Olsen encouraged the audience to understand the rules of the various platforms and said everyone needs to be monitoring what is being said through various tools, whether that be a free or paid tool(s).  But as good as tools might be, it’s important to have someone, who has an understanding of the industry as well as social media, reviewing the information.

PRSA-NCC president Johnson reviewed the code of ethics for several professional organizations and found they all had truth, honesty, and fairness as the basis for the codes. She commented that we are all guided by our ethics, first, so don’t ignore them. She encouraged all to work to stop the idea of being spin pros.

How do you counsel clients on privacy and transparency? Are their examples you can share with the BurrellesLuce Fresh Ideas readers?

In PR and the Media: September 14, 2011

Wednesday, September 14th, 2011

Mashable Expanding Its Coverage (Media Coder/NYTimes)
“Mashable, the popular Web site for information about technology and social media, said Tuesday that it was expanding coverage to include new sections for entertainment, United States news and world news, and that it was hiring a veteran technology editor to oversee all editorial content.”

Where Newspapers Thrive (LA Times)
“Some 8,000 weekly papers still hit the front porches and mailboxes in small towns across America every week and, for some reason, they’ve been left out of the conversation.”

Court OKs Suit Over Toyota ‘Prank’ Campaign (MediaPost)
“A California appellate court has handed a defeat to Toyota and Saatchi & Saatchi, its ad agency, in a lawsuit stemming from a viral “prank a friend” campaign that went awry.”

Photo Posts Major Mobile Activity (MediaPost)
“Tracking its panel of 294 smartphone and tablet owners, Prosper finds 69.4% are reading status updates on their networks, 53.4% are updating their own status. But 65.6% are viewing photos and 49% are posting photos.”

Lights, Camera, Advertisements (WSJ.com)
“More advertiser-created shows are running on the internet. They could provide a new template for TV that harkens back to the era when advertisers not only sponsored but helped to create, cast, and script ‘soap operas’ and variety shows.”