Posts Tagged ‘healthcare’


How to Maintain Client Satisfaction – Webinar Recap

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Scott Cytron Formal 2011Last week BurrellesLuce had the pleasure of presenting a webinar with Scott H. Cytron, ABC, president Cytron and Company, on How to Maintain Client Satisfaction. Click here to view the recording of the presentation or download the slides at your convenience.

In today’s economy retaining a client or customer is not only easier than finding a new one, it also costs less in time and resources. Yet, organizations may need a boost to determine what their customers need in order to nurture and solidify this very important long-term relationship and continue to provide value that bolsters the bottom line.

Most PR, marketing, and communications, professionals know that engaging with clients is key to measuring satisfaction. However, many struggle with asking the right questions and fostering the relationship.

Here are just some of the takeaways from Scott Cytron’s presentation:

  • 3-step rule to happy clients: Trust + Loyalty + Referrals.
  • Put yourself in front of the client, ideally in person if possible.
  • Pick up the phone. When was the last time you called?
  •  Know what you’re going to ask the client.

The results of your conversation should provide you with some concrete feedback. Ideally, the best result would be “no surprises.” However, “good feedback” is always great too. If the client gives you “not-so-good feedback,” see it as an opportunity to dig deeper. Scott reminds us that “All hope is not lost” and to “turn negatives into positives and call in the Calvary.”

Depending on your organization, clients, and goals – surveys may be another way to gain client feedback. There is no one-size-fits-all survey, but Scott provides some pointers to increase success, including keeping it short, making it available online, and setting a return deadline. Whatever feedback you gain from the survey, it is important to use the results in a positive way and not just forget about them.

Scott offers other insights during the webinar. Click here to download the recording of the presentation or download the slides at your convenience.

***

Scott Cytron, ABC, is a frequent speaker on growth strategies and organizational communications, including using social media for business building and retention. He is president of Cytron and Company, a consultancy specializing in public relations, marketing, and communications activities for clients in professional services (accounting, healthcare, financial planning, legal) and B2B product/services.

When It Comes to Brands and Content, Simplicity Matters

Wednesday, April 6th, 2011

Valerie Simon

iStock_Communication_SmallThis weekend, in a Wall Street Journal article, former chairman of the FEC, Arthur Levitt, suggested: “When an editor wants a reporter to explain something more clearly in a news article, she might say: ‘Tell it to Aunt Edna.’ Aunt Edna is the stand-in for a regular person, someone who has never thought about a cloture motion in the Senate, a municipal bond offering, or some other obscure issue of our public life.” Good advice to all those in the field of communications who are responsible for sharing important information with the public.

The practice of using simple language, however, isn’t always so simple, particularly for those experts in specialty fields, like healthcare or finance, who are tasked with communicating precise and complex information to the general public. Add the pressure and influence of company stakeholders, legal concerns, and a desire to be creative, and it is easy to see why “simple” is not always easy to achieve.

Put yourself in the role of the consumer…

  • Will “Aunt Edna” be confused by your message?
  • Will she grow frustrated trying to understand the industry jargon you are using, or overwhelmed trying to make sense of the information presented to her?
  • Will Aunt Edna grow uneasy or even lose trust in your company?

Now if, Aunt Edna has little patience for jargon and pretentious language, what about “Uncle Walt” (my stand in for the ubiquitous journalist)? Trade publications and academic journals notwithstanding, today’s reporters, producers and editors need to appeal to a broad audience. They are under increasing pressure to produce more, under tighter deadlines.

  • Will Uncle Walt need to read your press release multiple times in order to make sense of it? Will he even read your release for that matter?
  • How difficult is it for him to find the information he needs on your website?
  • Does all of the material and jargon lend itself to mis-quotes and factual misinterpretations?
  • Are the key messages you hope Uncle Walt will take away easy to identify?

Understand that looking out for Aunt Edna is not a charitable exercise. Customers like Aunt Edna are more loyal, and even willing to pay more, for brands that offer communications, interactions and experiences that are easy to understand and use. In fact, U.S. Brands Could Gain $27 Billion in 2011 by Bringing Consumers Simpler Experiences and Interactions, according to the findings of the Siegel+Gale  2010 Global Brand Simplicity Index.

So what global brands offer the simplest communications and what is the real pay off? For more tangible details on the value of simplicity, be sure to join BurrellesLuce and Brian Rafferty, Siegel+Gale Global Director, Customer Insights, for a free on-demand webinar on Using the Power of Simplicity to Optimize Brand Communications and learn about the findings of the 2010 Global Brand Simplicity Index. 

In the meantime, I offer you this challenge: Take a look at your online press room through the eyes of Aunt Edna and Uncle Walt. How much time does it take you to identify the key points? Is there anything subject to interpretation? Does your communication hold up to the “Aunt Edna test”? Does your competitor? Then, on the BurrellesLuce Fresh Ideas blog, tell us what you find out.

I Thought Paying for Healthcare Was My Biggest Concern…

Wednesday, May 27th, 2009

2109163748_9d7f40b1f6_mRecently, a New York Times article, “Webcast Your Brain Surgery? Hospitals See Marketing Tool,” addressed how some hospitals are using social media in the operating room. I was initially intrigued, but became quickly horrified at the prospect. It’s proven that multi-tasking isn’t always a good idea. Example: the Metrolink Engineer who was texting seconds before the commuter train crash in the fall. Trains are on tracks to maintain their course, yet that wasn’t enough to control reaction time. So why when anything can happen with the human condition is it being applauded to have distractions?

I believe, most of us can agree, social media has caused a significant blurring of the lines between marketing, customer service, and public relations. But enough already. I’m not sure about the rest of you, but if I’m lying on an operating table I want the focus to be getting me off the table in better health than when I arrived. The reality: anywhere there is a camera there is someone wondering how they look. The last thing I want is my nurse or doctor letting their mind wander. “Do these scrubs make me look fat?” Or worse, instead of noticing an arterial condition a doctor asks for advice on how to describe the last incision in 140 characters. Marketing can turn every airline tray and shopping cart into a commercial, but please stay out of the operating suite.

Today, I’m especially thankful BurrellesLuce offers decent healthcare coverage. Once malpractice insurance providers get wind of these stories, rates will go up which will increase end-user costs.

I’d love to hear from any of you who have found a healthcare provider using social media? Was it a referral or did you watch a brain surgery online and think “I should look into that for myself”?