Posts Tagged ‘Google Alerts’


Don’t Be a Tool: a Guide to the Latest Social Media Tools (BurrellesLuce Webinar Recap)

Monday, October 15th, 2012

Nearly every month yet another social media measurement tool appears on the horizon, promising to bring better insights, increased efficiency, and better performance. All too often PR and marketing professionals yield to “social media shiny tool syndrome.”

This was the topic of a recent webinar by BurrellesLuce and Brad B. McCormick, principal at 10 Louder Strategies, “Don’t Be a Tool: A Guide To the Latest Social Media Tools.” Click here to view the on-demand recording of the presentations.

Tips for Getting the Most Out of Your Social Media Tools

McCormick suggests the following tips to avoid social media shiny tool syndrome.

  • Make sure it is a tool you really need.
  • Select the right tool for the job.
  • Training and practice are essential.
  • Not all tools are created equal.
  • Take the integral view of revenue. (ROI is where paid, owned, earned intersect.)

A List of Social Media Tools
There are a variety of social media tools available for listening, influencer identification, notification, monitoring and management, measurement. Most times you get what you pay for; however, a more expensive tool doesn’t always guarantee that it will deliver better results. McCormick suggests choosing from the following free and paid tools:

What do you think of these tools? Which others would you add to the list?

SAVE THE DATE- UPCOMING PRODUCT DEMONSTRATION WEBCAST
Thursday, October 18, 2012 @ 2:00pm EDT.

Join Tressa Robbins of BurrellesLuce and Jack Monson of Engage121 for this informative product demonstration of the BurrellesLuce social media monitoring tool (Engage121).

Google Alerts and AP Coverage in a Post-Licensing Agreement Environment

Friday, February 26th, 2010

by Stephen Lawrence*

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In the wake of my last post, search engine giant Google and the Associated Press (AP) reached an agreement allowing Google to return to hosting AP content.  Did the floodgates then open to overwhelm my inbox with those “author:  Samantha Critchell” Google News Alerts which I had previously set? 

Not exactly. 

During the full calendar week of February 14th – 20th, I received 18 separate alerts containing a total of 27 links. This was a slight improvement over the reporting of 16 alerts and 20 links for the previous period of January 19th – February 2nd. When broken down by source the pattern remains the same:

  • ABC News led with 14 links linking back to AP material hosted on their parent site.
  • Newspaper sites accounted for 10 more.
  • While the remaining three were either foreign or with no hard-copy editions.

The print to web ratio for the prior period, as I found, was evenly matched this week. 

  • Five of the ten Google alerted newspaper articles had a corresponding print presence. 
  • The remaining articles were web exclusives.

One might have expected to see a greater surge of articles since this most recent “experiment” coincided with New York Fashion Week and Ms. Critchell is the AP’s fashion maven.  Her subjects ranged from Marc Jacobs, Zac Posen, and Luca Luca to Naomi Campbell’s Fashion benefit for Haitian relief.  (During the previous period, topics ranged from the Golden Globes to Vera Wang’s designs at previous Winter Olympics.)

A similar Yahoo! News search supplies only six newspaper stories along with a smattering of local TV sites, a couple of which overlapped with the Google Alerts coverage.

To date, our BurrellesLuce readers have located over 80 articles published during that week attributed to Samantha Critchell (this includes the five mentioned earlier). And, these are only the ones relating purely to Fashion Week coverage.  There are an additional 100+ older articles which saw print in newspapers.

While there may well be a number of underlying factors at work here – ranging from other individual licensing agreements to spidering blocks – the raw totals are telling.

This week, we find an 8:1 disparity in Fashion Week coverage, or an 18:1 disparity in subject coverage for this print to web experiment. 

For my purposes, this was but a simple experiment. But would you be willing to subject your client to such uncertainties knowing these possible results?

*Bio: A native of Mesa, Arizona, I graduated from the University of Arizona with a major in Near Eastern Studies. I began my career with BurrellesLuce in 1997 as a reader. As with most readers, I developed a special relationship with my assigned papers – those small town dailies and weeklies of the same flavor that my family had been employed in for two generations. Currently, I hold the position of quality assurance specialist, troubleshooting daily production issues. Outside interests include woodworking, and keeping my wife and dog happy. Twitter: BurrellesLuce; Facebook: BurrellesLuce

Google Alerts and AP Coverage of Samantha Critchell: A BurrellesLuce Experiment

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

by Stephen Lawrence*

Flickr Image: ClickyKBD

Flickr Image: ClickyKBD

To follow up on my previous post regarding Google’s (non)-coverage of Associated Press content, I opted to take a more controlled approach for this submission.

In other words, I let other people do the leg work for me.

A Google Alert was set up with the specific instructions: “author: Samantha Critchell.”  This would, of course, only return articles attributed to that name.  Why Samantha Critchell?  She’s a leading AP writer covering topics relevant to the cosmetics and fashion industry.  And, as we know, with the AP’s arching distribution of content, brand placement in her work would reach a very wide and diverse potential consumer readership.

Internally, we set up an order to monitor U.S. papers for Associated Press articles penned by Samantha Critchell, which I would monitor.

During a two week period (Jan. 19 – Feb. 2), Google alerted my email inbox 16 times with a total of 20 article links.  In this window, Ms. Critchell penned nine major articles ranging from a Golden Globes fashion round-up and a primer on facial mask products, to a feature on Vera Wang’s figure skating designs for previous Winter Olympic events.

The Alerts broke down as follows:

  • Four of the articles were from ABC News.com, which fell outside of my print coverage experiment
  • Three more were from the Canadian press, which also fell outside of parameters of the U.S. press.
  • Of the remaining 13 domestic newspapers, our readers located the same articles from 11 of their print editions.
  • Regarding that missing duo, one was from a paper which we have simply not yet received as of this time.  While the other, seems to not have published the article in its print edition.  Point goes to Google.

Last week, Yahoo and the Associated Press announced their own licensing agreement to allow the stream of AP content to Yahoo’s sites.  So, to add some additional gist to the topic, I ran a search through Yahoo News with the same subject and date parameters. 

The resulting hits were from eight newspapers and a single website.  Those are fewer results than the totals from Google.

  • Surprisingly, none of the Yahoo! News results corresponded to those of Google News.
  • Four of the eight newspapers articles were found in the print editions by BurrellesLuce readers.
  • Three of the articles did not appear in the print editions of the publications and another article originates from an edition which we have not yet received. Points again to Yahoo.

On the other side of the coin, our BurrellesLuce readers located articles credited to Ms. Critchell in an additional 114 papers published during the same two week period. 

That’s a ten to one loss in coverage for Google. Perhaps this can chiefly be attributed to the search giant’s ongoing wrangling with the Associated Press over compensation, (never mind that it doesn’t cover paid or subscription based sources). Even with the agreement between Yahoo News and the AP, how can the discrepancy in sources and numbers be explained?  And in either case, how might such a potential loss affect your clients in the interim?

*Bio: A native of Mesa, Arizona, I graduated from the University of Arizona with a major in Near Eastern Studies. I began my career with BurrellesLuce in 1997 as a reader. As with most readers, I developed a special relationship with my assigned papers – those small town dailies and weeklies of the same flavor that my family had been employed in for two generations. Currently, I hold the position of quality assurance specialist, troubleshooting daily production issues. Outside interests include woodworking, and keeping my wife and dog happy. Twitter: BurrellesLuce; Facebook: BurrellesLuce

Google Nexus One – AP Case Study

Monday, January 25th, 2010

By: Stephen Lawrence*

Internet_NewsAs readers of the BurrellesLuce Fresh Ideas blog are already well aware, search engine giant Google is no longer making the Associated Press’ content available through its search results.  And while there are a multitude of other news aggregators and distributors available on the Internet, no others can match the reach that the AP has in the traditional media.

Those in the PR industry who are relying simply on Google Alerts to track theirs and their client’s influence are at a distinct disadvantage, as access to hundreds of daily and weekly newspapers has effectively disappeared.  Some AP content is still appearing in fresh searches, but it seems to be limited to a couple of newspapers. And those may soon disappear if an updated licensing agreement is not reached between the two by month’s end.

Which returns us to the thesis of my previous postings “Can relying on other internet search engines, paid or unpaid, fulfill your monitoring needs?”  Just how much distributed content is even available on newspaper’s websites, much less through Google Alerts?

To address that question, I examined the availability of a recent AP article spotlighting (ironically) the introduction of Google’s Nexus One phone.  The article, authored by AP business writer Michael Liedtke, ran on January 6th and was published in dozens of daily newspapers throughout the U.S.  This information came from our own available archives of scanned hard copy publications.

Twenty-five publications, with an average circulation of 50,000, were sampled.  A simple string of “Google Phone” was used to mirror any likely Boolean spidering phrases and the websites searched.

  • Fifteen of the 25 newspaper websites did not return a result for the article.
  • Thus, 60 percent of the print coverage was lost for this small exercise

Separate queries were entered on the major search sites that constituted more involved filtering and human interaction.

  • Google Search: “Google Phone Liedtke” did result in a number of legitimate newspaper website articles, but none from the original sampling.
  • Bing Search: “Google Phone Liedtke” in the News tab resulted in two incorrect articles, while a general web search returned mostly local TV sites which contain AP material.  Very few newspapers were offered and those that were, duplicated the Google results.
  • Yahoo! News Search:  “Google Phone Liedtke” yielded more website coverage, but nothing mirroring the hard copy coverage.  None of the 15 sites which I located were represented in the search results.

This is only one example of how Google’s non-coverage of AP content could potentially affect public relations and marketing professionals who rely solely on “free” content. Expand that to other industry interests or areas relevant to you and your client – and how much are you willing to pay for free? How are you making adjustments given Google’s change in practice?

*Bio: A native of Mesa, Arizona, I graduated from the University of Arizona with a major in Near Eastern Studies. I began my career with BurrellesLuce in 1997 as a reader. As with most readers, I developed a special relationship with my assigned papers – those small town dailies and weeklies of the same flavor that my family had been employed in for two generations. Currently, I hold the position of quality assurance specialist, troubleshooting daily production issues. Outside interests include woodworking, and keeping my wife and dog happy. Twitter: BurrellesLuce; Facebook: BurrellesLuce