Posts Tagged ‘Fast Company’


Digital Marketing Insights from the Mid-Atlantic Marketing Summit

Tuesday, May 8th, 2012

Social media is boring, so let’s find a way to influence the physical world, says Peter Corbett, CEO of iStrategyLabs, when highlighting his latest projects during the Mid-Atlantic Marketing Summit on April 20. The full-day event, sponsored by the Capitol Communicator and Potomac Tech Wire, was held at Gannett headquarters and included insights from marketing, communications, advertising and public relations experts.

With many folks overwhelmed by the number of social media platforms available, one panel attempted to put the social networkings into perspective. Moderated by Geoff Livingston, vice president of strategic partnerships at Razoo, the panelists looked at several options beyond Facebook and Twitter and shared what worked for their organizations. All the panelists encouraged participants to find out what platforms their core audience use.

Commenting on Google+ users, Kevin Dando, director of digital marketing and communications at PBS, says the site is just a place for men to talk about being on Google+. However, you shouldn’t discount Google+ because it will help your website’s page rank. Additionally, Google+ and YouTube are becoming closer and will soon have shared search. On the other side of the spectrum, Pinterest has mostly female users and can be very effective for visual campaigns.

PBS, like other TV networks, needs to be on GetGlue, a platform that allows users to check into TV shows and other entertainment media. Dando says shows with live Twitter events have ratings one percent higher than those without. He commented Tumblr doesn’t drive a lot of traffic, but it does have a lot of engagement.

The role of chief marketer has become chief storyteller, says Debra Lavoy, director of product marketing at OpenText. You should use the story to pull the team together and that content marketing should be renamed substance marketing.

If his marketing budget was increased, Vocus’s Jason Jue says he would wish for more storytellers. (Download this PR Storytelling tip sheet from BurrellesLuce). Speaking of storytellers, when I asked the Beyond Facebook and Twitter panel if they could review Storify, they said they were all fans, especially for events. At SXSW, they said they barely left a session before someone would post all the tweets from the event to a new Storify.

Examples of brands using marketing and social media for good and helping causes were also abundant. For example, Terry Macko, senior vice president of communications and marketing for the World Wildlife Fund, discussed WWLF teaming with Coke to raise awareness about the environment. Despite backlash and confusion over the white cans, the campaign raised over two million dollars.

The summit inspired several great blog posts, including:

Who Can You Trust? Mainstream Versus Social Media News Sources

Friday, April 9th, 2010

by Crystal deGoede*

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Razzle.com

We all rely on mainstream media to tell us what is going on in the world. We trust the credibility of traditional news as an authority and we expect that at least 95 percent of what they report is the truth. It’s also no secret that the bulk of social media relies on traditional media as the source of its content as well. (Citizen journalism, in the form of breaking world events, is the exception not the rule, but even that often overlaps with traditional media.) I have to admit that I use social media during the day to get a quick glimpse of headlines from the traditional media outlets that I follow – and I am sure that I am not alone.

So, why are more traditional media outlets getting their “news” from social media lately? Social Media is fast and cuts to the chase (only 140 characters), but most of the time we have to wonder if what we are reading is even true (assuming we’re reading what we’re about to tweet or repost in the first place). And with the media landscape changing, it is understandable that mainstream media would want to remain the go-to source. But at what price?

Last Thursday was everyone’s favorite holiday, the one day that you can call your parents and tell them you got married in Vegas, “Aprils Fool’s Day.” We saw many large, well-known organizations joining in with their own pranks, such as Google, changing its name to Topeka, and McDonald’s, going along with a post by Grist, an environmental news website…

Grist announced that McDonald’s would no longer continue its worldwide composting initiatives after a University of California-Berkeley scientist discovered that none of the items on the menu would compost – complete with a photo seemingly depicting a year old “Happy Meal” still relatively fresh. What makes this story interesting is that the news began to spread across social media as if it was legitimate. All of this began with a blog post on March 3rd by Joann Bruso, wishing her “Happy Meal” a “Happy Birthday” and that lead to Grist’s April Fool’s prank. The question is how or why did a New York Times writer tweet the story?  (Check out a recent Fast Company article to see how the story plays out.)

In an effort to keep up with the ever-changing media landscape, do you think traditional media outlets are cutting corners and not checking their facts? Or are they just trying to stay hip – proving they’re in on the joke? It is funny how six months ago studies showed that people tweeting and updating in social media were using content from mainstream media sources and I still find that true. But are we all becoming so gullible and wrapped up in the “I want it now” lifestyle that we are making short-cuts in order to be the first to report?

I am sure you all remember the breaking news last July that actor Jeff Goldblum was dead. Many popular news organizations actually printed, and ran with the story for a couple of hours even though they found it online and the reports weren’t confirmed. I place a lot of trust in traditional media, as I am sure most of you do, and I always will; accidents happen and people post without understanding the repercussions and without scrutinizing the facts. No matter if we are a major news journalist or a back office tweeter, can we ever know that something on the Internet or printed in the paper is completely true? Not unless we are willing to get the hard-facts, do the research, and spend hours verifying every source.

As major news organizations, journalist, and mainstream bloggers they are trusted by their publics and their credibility depends on “getting the facts right” and producing quality stories. And as news consumer don’t we have an obligation to educate ourselves and help ensure accuracy before passing the information along? Shouldn’t the media and its audiences work together to create a certain standard of news and then hold each other accountable when it isn’t met? Then again, perhaps, “quick and easy” and “check the facts later” are the acceptable standards.

So, do you think mainstream media is trying to keep up with the fast-paced world of Twitter, Facebook, and other forms of social media by using content they find on the web?  Do you rely on traditional news outlets for the truth? Share your thoughts with the readers with BurrellesLuce Fresh Ideas.

*Bio: After graduating from East Carolina University with a Marketing degree in 2005, Crystal DeGoede moved to New Jersey. In her four years as a member of the BurrellesLuce marketing team and through her interaction with peers and clients she has learned what is important or what it takes to develop a career when you are just starting out. She is passionate about continuing to learn about the industry in which we serve and about her career path. By engaging readers on Fresh Ideas Crystal hopes to further develop her social media skills and inspire other “millennials” who are just out of college and/or working in the field of marketing and public relations. Twitter: @cldegoede LinkedIn: Crystal DeGoede Facebook: BurrellesLuce

Is Ashton Doing It Right, or Just Leading Us Astray?

Friday, December 11th, 2009

Katalyst HQ

by Crystal DeGoede*

Most of us can agree that the way people and businesses communicate has changed significantly over the past year. How is your company or organization establishing web credibility? In the December 2009 issue of Fast Company Magazine @ fastcompany the cover story is on Ashton Kutcher (@aplusk) becoming a “new” media mogul.

Katalyst Media, Ashton’s production company, has produced a web-series just for Facebook called Katalyst HQ, which shows the daily life of employees at Katalyst. Their goal: to entertain the target audience of the brands they promote, in an effort to go where the audience is already and message there (i.e., Facebook and Twitter).  Since Ashton has more than 3 million Facebook fans and Twitter followers, brands such as Nestle, Pepsi and Kellogg’s, are jumping onboard, in hopes of obtaining a similar following.

Does that mean the days of traditional advertising with a banner ad on your industry’s leading pub over? Netscape founder Marc Andreessen seems to think so, “Banner ads aren’t going to cut it,” he says. “And media companies have not been creative or aggressive about making products designed for engagement marketing. Now that’s changing, giving brand advertisers a new way and reason to buy.”

Kutcher wants his company to be the new go-to source for brands looking to engage in “influencer marketing,” which is when you focus on specific individuals and their influence over potential buyers rather than the whole target market and direct your marketing initiatives around these influencers. Garrett Schmidt, who leads the experience design and client-strategy practice for digital marketing firm Razorfish, agrees. “People are discovering that experience matters more than traditional advertising now,” he notes.

When you aren’t a celebrity like Ashton Kutcher or don’t have over 3 million fans/followers on Facebook and Twitter, how do you leverage social media and acquire brand fans in order to gain “web cred”?  As a PR, communications or marketing professional, do you have a 2010 plan for creating engagement marketing campaigns for your brand?

Please share your thoughts with the readers of BurrellesLuce Fresh Ideas.

*Bio: After graduating from East Carolina University with a Marketing degree in 2005, Crystal DeGoede moved to New Jersey. In her four years as a member of the BurrellesLuce marketing team and through her interaction with peers and clients she has learned what is important or what it takes to develop a career when you are just starting out. She is passionate about continuing to learn about the industry in which we serve and about her career path. By engaging readers on Fresh Ideas Crystal hopes to further develop her social media skills and inspire other “millennials” who are just out of college and/or working in the field of marketing and public relations. Twitter: @cldegoede LinkedIn: Crystal DeGoede Facebook: BurrellesLuce