Posts Tagged ‘economy’


BurrellesLuce Complimentary Webinar: Managing, Motivating, and Leading Millennials

Thursday, October 18th, 2012

BurrellesLuce Complimentary Webinar: Managing, Motivating, and Leading MillennialsBurrellesLuce Complimentary Webinar: Managing, Motivating, and Leading Millennials

When: Monday, October 22, 2012

Time: 1:00 pm EDT

Register Now!

The PR industry is recovering faster than the economy. So your organization must renew its focus on effectively engaging and inspiring Millennials, our largest and fastest-growing pool of PR professionals. That’s because they’re once again getting choosy about the firms where they work.

Is your organization Millennial-friendly? Join BurrellesLuce and Ken Jacobs, principal at Jacobs Communication Consulting, LLC, and find out!

This webinar will provide knowledge about this demographic group that will help attendees to better understand and lead them, while reducing the frustration many Gen-Xers and Boomers report in attempting to do so.

  • The 10 most important traits you must understand about Millennials.
  • The 20 most important actions you can take to help you manage, lead and motivate Millennials more effectively.
  • The dichotomy of their exaggerated-yet-delicate sense of self.
  • Why they want freedom, yet desire structure and frequent feedback.
  • Key differences between Millennials and Gen-Xers.
  • What they want from their work environment…and from you.
  • How to optimize your communications with them.

Register Now!

Moderator:
Johna Burke, senior vice president, marketing, BurrellesLuce

Space is limited. Sign up now for this free webinar, “Managing, Motivating and Leading Millennials.” If we are unable to accept your registration, an on-demand presentation will be available for review after the event at www.burrellesluce.com.

BurrellesLuce Newsletter: Six Tips for Signing and Keeping Clients in a Reviving Economy

Friday, May 20th, 2011

iStock_000016298467Small

May 2011

While the last few years have witnessed new opportunities and tools to advance media and client engagement, the period also has been marked by tumultuous economic conditions. During that time, many PR agencies, especially small- and medium-sized firms, have struggled to maintain clients, and attract new ones.

With strong signs of a pick-up in business activity, the climate now is right for PR professionals to develop strategies and tactics that can help them bring in new clients as well as hold on to current accounts.

In this BurrellesLuce Newsletter, “Six Tips for Signing and Keeping Clients in a Reviving Economy,” you’ll learn half a dozen best practices that PR owner-practitioners can use to boost their chances of profitting from the economy upturn.

Understanding and Eliminating Stress: Keys to Health and Success

Wednesday, February 9th, 2011

by Lauren Shapiro*

stressWho hasn’t been super stressed out in the past year? Between the economy, layoffs and undertaking of additional work at no additional pay – how could you not be stressed? Now, more than ever, employees are feeling strained without relief.  According to Dianne Buckner of CBC News, “When it comes to the pressing priorities of an average entrepreneur, managing the mental health of staff is probably not at the top of the list. Concern about whether or not employees are feeling good about their work and their lives likely has to take a back seat to issues related to surviving this tough economy, such as improving sales or reducing expenses.” Buckner goes on to write, “But touchy-feely as emotional well-being may sound, the fact is that issues such as anxiety, depression and burnout present some very real costs — and not just to individual enterprises, but to the economy as a whole.”

With internal pressures growing greater as we watch unemployment lines grow, these anxieties and stresses begin to affect the mind and body. It is important to note that there are different types of stress that we experience. Good stress motivates us to give a stellar presentation or to go above and beyond for a meeting. However, bad stress can cause negative effects including sleeplessness, headaches, high blood pressure or fatigue, illustrates an article in the San Jose Mercury News. Explains Reba Connell, Center for Stress Reduction, “Stressors, the life events that cause feelings of stress, can also often put the body in a chronic “fight or flight” or hyper-arousal mode. The feelings associated with fight or flight include accelerated heartbeat and breathing, tunnel vision and racing thoughts. This mode releases endorphins and cortisol, which can increase blood pressure, heart rate and blood sugar levels. High blood pressure can increase the risk of heart attack.”

There are plenty of ways to reduce stress. Taking a “mental health” day is a great way to take a step away from the hectic workday and focus on doing something for yourself. Put the BlackBerry down and relax. (Want more tips on how to reduce digital overload? Check out this BurrellesLuce newsletter.) Take a bath, go shopping, do something that you enjoy and take the time to enjoy it! “Mental health” days are great ways to break up the work week and remind you that things may not be as bad as they seem. They will rejuvenate you and bring you back to your non-stressed self.

If you can’t step away for a mental health day, here are some tips to keep stress at bay, as suggested by Rismedia.com

  1. Get plenty of sleep.
  2. Learn to make decisions quickly and let go of the need to over-analyze everything.
  3. Express your feelings and don’t bottle up your emotions.
  4. Avoid trying for perfections and don’t sweat the small stuff.
  5. Maintain a positive mental attitude by utilizing affirmative “self-talk.”
  6. Stop worrying so much and look at situations more optimistically.
  7. Smile and laugh frequently throughout the day; don’t take yourself so seriously.
  8. Mix leisure with work: take breaks and get away when you can.
  9. Become more tolerant. Don’t be overly critical of yourself or others.
  10. Keep a list of things to do and stay focused on short-term accomplishments

Does your organization provide stress relieving activities? How do you cope with stress prevalent in PR, marketing, communications, or client services?

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*Bio: Soon after graduating from the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, in 2006 with a B.A. in communication and a B.S. in business/marketing, I joined the BurrellesLuce client services team. In 2008, I completed my master’s degree in corporate and organizational communications and now serve as Director of Client Services. I am passionate about researching and understanding the role of email in shaping relationships from a client relation/service standpoint as well as how miscommunication occurs within email, which was the topic of my thesis. Through my posts on Fresh Ideas, I hope to educate and stimulate thoughtful discussions about corporate communications and client relations, further my own knowledge on this subject area, as well as continue to hone my skills as a communicator. Twitter: @_LaurenShapiro_ LinkedIn: laurenrshapiro Facebook: BurrellesLuce

Rise in Ad Spending Contributes to Media Companies’ Strong Q3 Earnings Led by Fox News Corp, Time Warner, and CBS

Monday, November 8th, 2010
Image Source: Positive Real Estate Professionals.com

Image Source: Positive Real Estate Professionals.com

I was about to write my post on how the latest and greatest technology is changing media – until I saw last week’s earnings releases start to roll in from the media sector. Time Warner (TW), Fox and then CBS all posted double digit increases: 

  • CBS saw a 42 percent increase in third quarter profits.
  • Fox cable network unit’s quarterly income improved by $146 million compared to the same period a year ago.
  • TW’s better than expected earnings contributed 62 cents per share, compared with Wall Street projections of 53 cents.

(Source: New York Times, “Profit Rises at Time Warner and at News Corporation,” 11.3.10)

The media giants earnings from last quarter are not only good news for shareholders, but for an industry that has seen its share of challenges over the last two years – battling online sites, cord cutting (customers canceling their pricey pay-TV subscriptions), falling TV ad revenues, not to mention the economy. According to this Reuters article, TW and Fox reiterated they saw no signs of cord cutting, a term adopted from the telephone companies to describe the shift from land lines to cell phones. “’I don’t get this cord cutting issue,’ News Corp Chief Operating Officer Chase Carey said on a conference call. ‘I feel it is a fundamental service that for American households is a fundamental part of what they do with their time, and what they value in their life.’”

The biggest reason for their strong earnings could be the most telling – and hopefully sustainable – number of all. All three media giants saw very encouraging increases in ad revenue in 2010. Both CBS and TW were up 10 percent, while Fox News Corp was up a whopping 16 percent from their domestic cable channels. (Source: Reuters, “WRAPUP 1-Media Sector Wrings Hands on 2011 Outlook,” 11.3.10)

Political ad spending was a nice shot in the arm for TV, with 2010 being an election year. In fact, political ad spending, for this year, is predicted at three billion dollars and may top 4.2 billion dollars, notes this Adage Age article.

Any numbers from 2010 should come in higher compared to a dreadful year in 2009. Last year TV ad spending was down by nine percent, led by a shredded car industry with the sectors TV ad spending down 23 percent compared to 2008. However, the increase in ad spending this year is still very impressive and driving revenue for a hard-pressed industry.

As quoted from this New York Times article, “’The takeaway is that advertising is strong,’ said Michael Nathanson, an analyst at Nomura. ‘The video ecosystem of affiliate fees and advertising seems to be holding up well.’”

This earnings season is proving to be a rebound year for media companies and is confirming what I have been writing about for the last two years – the same idea Sumner Redstone expressed before delivering very impressive earnings – “Content is King!”

The recipe seems simple for big media: provide great content; find a way to monetize the content; keep costs down; and let the content fall where it may. Then kick back and watch the revenue streams flow regardless of which platform audiences use to consume the content. It certainly is good to be king…at least for the moment.

Crisis Communications: A Case Study in the Making

Friday, July 2nd, 2010

by Lauren Shapiro*

Flickr Image: kbaird; Original Image: Charlie Riedel / AP

Flickr Image: kbaird; Original Image: Charlie Riedel / AP

British Petroleum has been making front page news since April 22nd as approximately 800,000 gallons of oil poured into the Gulf of Mexico each day. BP was once an organization thought to be a “friendly brand in the oil business” – despite its previous disasters. But as the oil continues to spill into the summer months, and according to government officials into the fall, BP is being scrutinized now more than ever.

One might assume that companies that specialize in goods/services, particularly those that could potentially wreak havoc on the safety of the world’s inhabitants, would have a well prepared protocol for crisis situations. Furthermore, if the company had a predecessor that experienced a similar crisis (i.e., Exxon Valdez, 1989) they would sculpt this protocol by learning from the mistakes previously made. It’s highly doubtful that BP did not have a crisis communication procedure in place, but was and is it a good one?

According to Chris Lehane, Newsweek’s master of disaster, “One of the rules of thumb of crisis management is that you can never put the genie back in the bottle in terms of what the underlying issue is. People evaluate you in terms of how you handle things going forward. And obviously doing everything to be open, transparent, accessible is the type of thing that the public does look for from a corporate entity in this type of situation.”

 As the situation in the Gulf continues to unfold, BP has promised one solution after another with no success – in other words, they over promised and under delivered, a cardinal “no-no” in business or any crisis resolution. Lehane states, “If you tell people what you are going to do, and you suggest it’s going to be successful, you need to be successful. Because once you create those expectations and you don’t fulfill them, when you already have a significant credibility problem, it further degrades your credibility.”

BP’s inability to implement a successful solution to fix the spill isn’t the only thing affecting its credibility. BP came under fire during the U.S. Congressional hearings when executives from BP, Transocean, and Halliburton took turns blaming each other for the incident coined “the worst environmental disaster in U.S. history.” And BP’s executives continue to make one public relations faux-pas after another: (more…)