Posts Tagged ‘Dow Jones’


U.S. Copyright Compliance Eyes Asia-Pacific

Monday, March 10th, 2014

BurrellesLuce US Copyright Compliance Eyes Asia-Pacific Fresh Ideas Tatjana JegdicA sweeping 12-country free trade agreement that is now being negotiated is much more than an attempt to open markets: It also has a significant copyright component. Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), in addition to opening the markets, represents an aggressive U.S. push to close the gaps in the intellectual property (IP) copyright and distribution protections.

The TPP’s IP/copyright agreement being negotiated could expand U.S. copyright standards to Asia-Pacific. It seeks to adopt US copyright restrictions on digital content for nations like Canada, Australia, Japan and North Korea. Ultimately, it could cover 40 percent of the world’s economy. TPP means PR pros face a future of an aggressive U.S. government push on copyrights internationally.

The Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA), the principal trade association for the software and digital content industries, is fully behind intellectual property rights in the TPP. SIIA encourages U.S. trade representatives to make the copyright portion of the agreement a priority, “Permit[ing] cross-border information flows, while ensuring that privacy and intellectual property rights are protected.”

The Intellectual Property Rights Chapter of TPP would have wide-ranging effects on publishers and internet providers. The TPP requires signing countries to protect a work, whether photographic, performance, or phonogram, for 70 years after the death of the person who created that work; for works by a “non-natural person” (whatever that is), the copyright be protected for “95 years from the end of the calendar year of the first authorized publication of the work.” Why does this matter to PR professionals? Because it extends the copyrights of intellectual property internationally, indicating just how seriously the U.S. government takes copyright issues.

Maira Sutton of Electronic Frontier Foundation says “copyright protections in the TPP would [also] empower internet service providers to police users’ internet activities [on behalf of publishers]. Therefore they could block or filter or even spy on users’ activities to supposedly enforce copyright.”

The Obama administration included part of the Stop Online Piracy Act legislation in the copyright chapter of TPP. SOPA, which meant to expand the U.S. law enforcement to fight online copyright infringement, was postponed by Congress in 2012.

If completed, TPP would remain open for any other country to join. Former U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk has welcomed China’s participation. “The area of ‘intellectual property’ is the key to billions of dollars in exports to China,” Kirk said. And China has already started indicating interest in TPP. Chinese participation would be game-changing not only because of the size of their market, but also because their poor track record on intellectual property.

Copyright compliance is a major issue in media monitoring and news aggregation. Content curators like BurrellesLuce that provide copyright compliance as part of their service will only continue to grow in importance.

The international IP developments around the TPP might also mean that recent domestic and cross-border copyright infringement cases will increase and will have more legal enforcement teeth behind them. In January, Dow Jones & Co. sued London-based Real-Time Analysis & News Ltd., a financial news aggregator service known as Ransquawk, for illegal distribution of the Dow Jones content without publisher consent. This case shows that copyright enforcement activity is not only confined to the U.S. information industry, but also crosses international jurisdictions.

The Dow Jones & Co. v. Ransquawk case looks very similar to the AP copyright infringement lawsuit against Meltwater, which AP won in May of last year. In recent years, Dow Jones also filed and received large settlement claims from other “hot news” misappropriation lawsuits like that against Cision.

BurrellesLuce – a curator, not an aggregator – of content has been a long-time supporter of making commercial use of news content with licensing agreements that pay publishers royalty fees. For close to 30 years we have worked with publishers to provide copyright-compliant content. We launched our turnkey compliance program in 2008. We strongly believe that news outlets must be fairly compensated for their content.

With our industry-unique service, our clients never have to worry about whether their access and use of media content is compliant or not. Thanks to our agreements with AP and thousands of other publishers, our small copyright royalty covers PR pros so they can legally share and use our digitized print clips and online news clips.

How are you protecting yourself and making sure you are on the right side of the expansionist U.S. copyright law? Do you think the TPP will bolster U.S. intellectual property rights?

Copyright Matters: Dow Jones Sues News Aggregator Ransquawk for Misappropriation

Friday, January 10th, 2014

Dow Jones Files Copyright Lawsuit Agains Ransquawk Ellis Friedman BurrellesLuceLast night, The Wall Street Journal reported that their parent company, Dow Jones & Co. sued Real-Time Analysis & News Ltd., a financial news aggregator service known as Ransquawk, for illegal distribution of the Dow Jones content without publisher consent.

Dow Jones claimed in its complaint that the London-based Ransquawk accessed the DJX newsfeed, which Dow Jones’ real-time financial news subscription service, and republished the content “verbatim, within seconds” of its publication. Ransquawk’s website says that it provides live news headlines in a 24-hour scrolling news feed, as well as real-time audio with breaking news and instant analysis, drawn from over 100 news sources.

In a statement on the Dow Jones Press Room, Jason Conti, SVP, general counsel and chief compliance officer, wrote that Dow Jones “refuse[s] to sit back when others swoop in to swipe our content.” He also claimed that Ransquawk is “systematically copying, pasting, and selling our journalists’ work.” There’s not much of a reply from Ransquawk; chief executive and co-founder Ranvir Singh said only that, “We obviously strongly deny any accusations made against us by Dow Jones … we will only be in a position to make a statement tomorrow.”

As we discussed on Monday, copyright compliance is a primary concern in media monitoring and news aggregation. This case looks to be very similar to that when the Associated Press filed a lawsuit against Meltwater for copyright infringement, a case which the AP won.

Why Ransquawk didn’t take notice then, we’ll never know, but they certainly shouldn’t be surprised at the lawsuit given that in recent years Dow Jones filed – and received large settlement claims from – other “hot news” misappropriation lawsuits against Briefing.com and Cision.

Once again, BurrellesLuce is not an aggregator but a curator, and we negotiate licensing fees with our providers to ensure our content is copyright compliant. We strongly believe that news outlets must be fairly compensated for their content, which EVP Johna Burke blogged about just three days ago. PR pros rely on content generated by high-caliber content produced by the AP, Dow Jones, and other providers not just for those valuable media mentions, but also for measurement purposes. In their need to be on top of the news, PR pros should protect the content they need and value by using services that respect and compensate the very publications that produce that content.

So many of us are committed to “community” nowadays, but where would the PR community be without journalism? Media and PR may be separate yet tandem communities, but they are part of the same ecosystem, and without balance on both sides, that ecosystem will crumble.

2010 Bulldog Reporter Media Relations Summit: Martin Murtland, Dow Jones Solutions for Communicators, Interviewed Johna Burke, BurrellesLuce

Tuesday, September 14th, 2010

Transcript –

JOHNA BURKE: Hello, this is Johna Burke with BurrellesLuce, and I’m here at the 2010 Bulldog Media Relations Summit. I’m joined by Martin.

Martin, will you please introduce yourself?

MARTIN MURTLAND: Good afternoon. My name’s Martin Murtland. I’m vice president at Dow Jones Solutions for Communicators. I’m here at Bulldog Reporter News Summit.

BURKE: Martin, can you talk about the qualities that PR practitioners need to have?

MURTLAND: That’s an interesting one. I think there’s probably two key qualities that I see communicators needing in the future, first one being their alignment to the business media, both to truly align themselves with what the business is trying to achieve. And secondly, I would say regards to analytical skills, the ability to question things. I’ve sort of looked at the future and sort of tried to create a–I’m interested in scenario planning, sort of four scenarios what the future may, may not hold. You sort of imagine a two-by-two grid where you have, at one end, people who are very much aligned to the business, and the other end people that have sort of, “vanity publishing.” You’re just going to get a publication where the coverage of the story with their CEO is actually a hometown newspaper. And the other axis we imagine something like highly analytical skills and that augment, you know, very uncomfortable with analytical skills. So what I would say, somebody who’s got high analytical skills and a–and strong alignment in business are going to be the winners in the future. And those are the things we should strive to try to become as communicators.

But some of the other scenarios, what I would say, they’re what I would term the bluffers. They’re people with good–can talk the talk. They’ve got political alignment to the business, but they don’t have the strong analytical skills to back it up. And they’re typically people who’ll move on after shorter period of time, perhaps before they get found out. And the other end of this expert spectrum I would sort of look at people who I call ostriches. They’re people that are very much into vanity publishing, or a world future that’s sort of run by ostriches. They’re very much into vanity publishing, and their idea of measurement would be how large–how loud the clip book makes whenever it hits the desk.

And then there’s the–sort of the final scenario for what the future may hold, is a world that’s sort of controlled by the gamblers. They’re people who do have strong analytical skills, but then they’re basing on flawed content or data. And so they’re doing the sophisticated analysis on not complete information. That’s why I call them gamblers. But what I–what I think, and certainly what I’m getting across in this conference is there’s a lot of winners out there, and how there’s a very good future in store for communicators as we look forward.

BURKE: Martin, thanks so much. And where can people find you in social media?

MURTLAND: I’ll try and do the–without doing the funny dot-com bit. You can find us at the conversationofcorporation.com.

BURKE: Great. Thank you so much.

MURTLAND: Thank you very much.

The Future of Public Relations: Seizing the Opportunity

Monday, July 19th, 2010

Bulldog Media Relations Summit Virtual Conference: The Future of Public Relations Seizing OpportunityI wasn’t able to attend this year’s Bulldog Reporter’s Media Relations Summit workshop (in New York) in person earlier this month. However, I did have the opportunity to attend virtually. 

Speakers for the panel “The Future of Public Relations: Seizing the Opportunity” consisted of:

  • Aedhmar Hynes, CEO of Text 100
  • Matt Harrington, president and CEO of Edelman U.S.
  • Peter Land, SVP, communications, at PepsiCo Beverages Americas
  • Martin Murtland, VP, solutions for corporate communications for Dow Jones Inc.

I’ve listed some of the key points that I heard in the podcast. (NOTE: Unfortunately since there was only audio and no video, I was unable to keep track of exactly who was speaking at some times – so my apologies, in advance, to the panel if I’ve not credited you with your quotes.)

Hynes talked about marketing, advertising, public relations, etc. all being separate departments with separate budgets, as this is the business model that’s served well in the past. However, in reality, the future of the industry is about communicating the brand of the organization. What are the goals as a whole and what are the skill sets that match those strategic goals? This is the time for organizations to think about the fundamental concept of moving away from managing information or news to shaping and directing conversation.

Companies must influence the influencers. The concept of third-party advocacy has never been more important than it is now.

As in any discussion of PR these days, the conversation moved to changes in ROI and measurement and analytics. We all know we should get away from ad value equivalency, but what do we use in its place (aside from media value)?  How do you know your campaign is a success?  There are many tools out there that measure “online buzz.” Yet what does that really mean?  It goes back to where you start – when you set your goals, they must be measurable. Measurable goals will drive your reporting and allow you to determine which strategies were successful.   

So, what does the future look like for public relations?

  • PR now has more opportunity and voice as it relates to corporate strategy. In other words, PR professionals are gaining more access to the C-suite.
  • The future (of PR) is about confidence and being nimble. According to Land, we must be able to move incredibly fast and confident to walk into our CEO’s office and make suggestions.
  • The move away from “agency of record” was briefly discussed because corporations have multiple needs (e.g., advertising, digital, creative, B2B, direct to consumer, etc.)  
  • The next decade in public relations is predicted to be the most exciting in history thus far. It may seem like it’s “back to the future,” as some have lost sight of fundamental best practices, but we must now come back to this strategic consulting in shaping views, per Hynes.

What would you add? What does the future of PR look like in your mind’s eye? If you attended the conference virtually, what are some of the points you took away from it. Please share your thoughts with me and the readers of BurrellesLuce Fresh Ideas.

The Changing World of News: How to Thrive and Survive During a Meltdown

Monday, February 9th, 2009

Steve Shannon

MeltdownThis past Thursday evening I attended a special event at the Paley Center for Media, The Changing World of News: How to Thrive and Survive During a Meltdown. When the invite arrived, in my BurrellesLuce email box, the title almost automatically demanded that I attend.

The program was co-presented by the Financial Times (FT) and introduced by J. Max Robins, Paley’s vice president and executive director of Industry Programs. Paul Murphy, the editor of the blog FT  Alphaville moderated. On the panel were Stacey-Marie Ishmael, reporter for FT Alphaville, Robert Passarella of Dow Jones, and Rick Bookstaber, an author and former managing director at Salomon Brothers.

As might be expected, the evening’s discussion centered around the recent turmoil in the markets and the role media played, as well as how media is evolving and affecting PRs (what the Brits succinctly call PR professionals), news, and the companies being covered.

PDA Delivery
Murphy is one of two FT journalists who comment live on market activity via FT Alphaville. Posting from London, their comments overlap with the opening of the U.S. markets. Murphy notes that consumers of news trend more towards summaries of news delivered via PDAs, rather than desktop or printed formats. I’ve sure heard a lot at PR conferences about how to effectively take advantage of social media, but I’ve heard nothing about how to leverage the format of the small PDA screen.

Vetting Third-Party Content …for a Fee
Another interesting concept Murphy highlighted was “The Long Room,” a section on Alphaville that for a fee, and vetted by the FT, third parties offer their opinions and expertise on financial matters of the day. I think we’ll see more of this interesting use of journalism/credibility of media, and the monetization of content. Ishmael, a London FT reporter now based in NYC, underscores this point by stating she now spends half her day reading and researching the comments section on Alphaville as they yield excellent sources for future reporting.

Passarella noted many newly unemployed Wall Streeter analysts are hanging out their own shingle and leveraging the web and social media to showcase their expertise and land clients. He foresees value in the aggregation of sector-specific news, as it would provide a broader landscape for organizations to cover financial news, but is unsure what the monetization of that model will be. For PRs, it means the same: even more voices to track in an ever-faster and more competitive information marketplace.

An Unpredictable Game of Dominos
The evening also included a presentation by Bookstaber who stated the recent market turmoil was a leveraged crises cycle. Bookstaber illustrated this by pointing out that when certain entities have large leveraged positions in an area heading south, they must sell other assets in large quantities to cover their losses. You can’t predict what markets will be affected as it is unknown who holds what. Case in point: the Hunt brothers tried to corner the silver market in the 1980s. When that collapsed, the Hunts covered their losses by selling their biggest holdings, cattle. The Hunt’s large sales of cattle trigged price drops in that market.

Bookstaber showed other instances similar to the silver-cattle model. He believes government regulation has a role here – identifying unknown positions and using that knowledge to perhaps head off future market meltdowns. For PRs, this should sound a familiar theme of transparency, and if Bookstaber’s model comes to be, another interesting communications challenge on both the buy and sell sides of the market.