Archive for ‘Online Video’:


Searching for What’s Next in Digital

Wednesday, April 10th, 2013
Flickr: Crystl

Flickr: Crystl

What will be the next big “game changer” for communicators?  And, how do we use it and interact with it correctly? These a few other questions were on the minds of the attendees to the first xPotomac conference on February 25.

Several presenters discussed Google and the newly announced Google Glass, and how the innovation will allow users to get their heads up. Keynote Vanessa Fox, CEO Nine by Blue, started the discussion with our habit of using Google, and how hard habits are to break. Geoff Livingston, author, marketer and xPotomac founder, along with Patrick Ashamalla, founder, A Brand New Way, said we are getting better at our Google habit. They noted one trick for Google Plus is to put your head-up to engage it. But, it will need to get smarter and begin to understand context to be truly useful. The more things are digitized, the less we are thinking. Display ads will be problematic, and the current model will need to change, especially as voice search expands.

There’s a flaw in our logic in asking Google the best way to drive traffic, because they say, “use Google.” What if Google is not the answer? Ken Yarmosh, CEO, Savvy Apps, says this came out of asking about using Bloggr vs  other sites, and agrees attention + influence is what’s next . He believes the looking at other traffic over the speed of indexing is more important.

Dino Dogan, founder, Triberr, believes the next big problem is the getting distribution power away from the big media outlets like the Huffington Post. There is a movement to take back the conversation. What’s next?  Dogan says it is attention + influence. He says the ground swell of peer to peer influence is taking hold.  He says the noise is not coming from us; it’s coming from the big media companies.

Moving into the visual revolution, Jenifer Consalvo, co-founder and COO, TechCocktail, discussed the use of the new Twitter video service, Vine, and how many companies are actually showing some restraint and waiting for a strategy before using it.  She encouraged us to look at the many how-to videos available and think of new ways to use the service. But, she reminded us to have a consistent message across all platforms. Visuals, in general, gain more engagement. Imagery is one of the biggest drivers of numbers for many platforms.

What do you think is the next big think in digital? Are you using any new technologies you can share with the BurrellesLuce Fresh Ideas readers?

PR and Fair-Use: What Practitioners Should Know

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

Crumpled Copyright

January 2013

As a PR and communications professional you’re no stranger to disseminating information to your constituents. What you may not be familiar with, however, is copyright compliance and the effects sharing protected content may have on you and your clients.

“Most blogs and online sources are subject to copyright and are not in the public domain. Fair-use allows for limited use of content with proper citation depending on the purpose and character of the use, the nature of the copyrighted work, how much of the content is used relative to the work as a whole, and whether the use will affect the potential market for or value of the content. Who is sharing and using the content also is considered when determining if the use falls under the fair-use doctrine,” explains this Copyright Compliance Primer from BurrellesLuce.

In this newsletter, we will explore with you the 4 Ps of copyright compliance:

  • Proper Sharing
  • Proper Copying
  • Proper Citation
  • Proper Monitoring and Distribution

Read more on of this BurrellesLuce newsletter – PR and Fair-Use: What Practitioners Should Know.

TED Talks: Joe Sabia – The technology of storytelling

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012

 

View the original video and transcript here.

TED Talks: David Kelly – How to Build Your Creative Confidence

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

 

View the original transcript and video here.

Key Media Training Skills For Public Relations Professionals

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012

According to TJ Walker of Media Training Worldwide, who recently led a PRSA webinar on Media Training for Public Relations Professionals, there are some key skills we need to know as PR professionals to help our clients prepare for a media interview. 

Walker says for every interview, your goal is to get your message across in the final story. But there are actually five possible outcomes:

  1. Interview, no quote
  2. Quoted out of context (and sounds racist, sexist, ageist, etc.)
  3. Quoted, but not your message
  4. Quoted and pretty much on message (sort of by accident)
  5. Quoted, word-for-word the message you wanted (and picked in advance)

In order to get to the preferred outcome (#5 above), you first must remember that you have no control over what the reporter will ask. However, there are three elements that you do have control over.

“So, what if a reporter rapid fires several questions at me?” Pick the question to reply to based on which one will let you get back to your message the quickest ~ TJ Walker, Media Training Worldwide.

 

How to look comfortable.  Your client can remember everything you’ve coached them on, including their key message. However, no one will remember if they look stiff or scared.  Walker says PR pros should never ever let their client do an interview without a video rehearsal. It doesn’t matter the quality of camera (You can use your cell phone, iPad, or whatever.) It’s just practice.  You can even shoot the video in the cab on the way to the interview, as long as your spokespeople see and hear themselves. Even for telephone or traditionally print media, Walker recommends video rehearsal as there are some things that can be heard even if not seen. And, besides, you can pause video to show “bad’ sound bites so the client can hear for themselves.

How to get a solid 30-second point / message across. While brainstorming (sitting around discussing what should be said) has its value, you must get into rehearsal mode as part of your interview prep. What you think you’re going to say goes out the window when the interview begins.  Walker advised that when brainstorming, you need to isolate every single message or idea—talking in paragraphs can’t be processed and the context may get cut. Think about what the reporter may ask, what the audience may want to know, and what you want to say, and then narrow that down to the top three. PR pros should not allow their client to do the interview until they’ve narrowed their focus to these three key points and can express them in 30-second sound bites.

How to answer interview questions. Interviews are not like a normal conversation.  Responses need to be kept positive, and never guess! If your client doesn’t know the answer, it’s okay to say that – and then bridge back to your three messages.

During the webinar, attendees were able to ask questions, and there was one regarding wardrobe choices that I found exceptionally noteworthy.  We ladies tend to think black makes us look slimmer, but Walker says on video black can actually make you look fat. If you can’t see where your body stop and arms begin, your body just blends together making you look wide! Totally makes sense but I’d never thought about it in those terms.

Do you have a media training experience you’d like to share with our readers? What media training tips can you add?