Posts Tagged ‘video’


Jargonology Episode 3: Advocado

Thursday, January 30th, 2014

Jargonology is our grand gesture to – our celebration of – the maligned corporate lexicon. To jargon, we doff our hats by coining new terms that, while tongue-in-cheek, are no less useful than existing jargon.

Awaken you inner word scientist and join us every Thursday when we uncover new Jargonology terms.  Leave your concoctions in the comments or tweet it at us at @BurrellesLuce

Watch on YouTube

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Jargonology, Episode 2: Influenzer

Thursday, January 23rd, 2014

Jargonology is our grand gesture to – our celebration of – the maligned corporate lexicon. To jargon, we doff our hats by coining new terms that, while tongue-in-cheek, are no less useful than existing jargon.

Awaken you inner word scientist and join us every Thursday when we uncover new Jargonology terms.  Leave your concoctions in the comments or tweet it at us at @BurrellesLuce

Watch on YouTube

CabinSketch font by fontsquirrel

Jargonology, Episode 1: Hashtagectomy

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

Jargonology is our grand gesture to – our celebration of – the maligned corporate lexicon. To jargon, we doff our hats by coining new terms that, while tongue-in-cheek, are no less useful than existing jargon.

Awaken you inner word scientist and join us every Thursday when we uncover new Jargonology terms.  Leave your concoctions in the comments or tweet it at us at @BurrellesLuce

See this on our YouTube channel

Cabinsketch font by fontsquirrel

Hashtag #Six-Second Attention Spans: Adding Twitter’s Vine to Your PR Toolbox

Monday, October 28th, 2013

Adding Vine to your PR ToolboxWhile the Wall Street types are figuring out whether to invest in Twitter’s IPO or wait to buy in, journalists, PR professionals and marketers have been figuring out if and how to invest in Vine, Twitter’s emerging micro-video service. It’s just another example of adapting social media strategy to an ever-evolving landscape of tools.

With Twitter’s hotly-anticipated $1.4 billion early November #IPO trending in the investor community, the company’s micro-video sharing app Vine, which integrates into Twitter and Facebook feeds, is heating up with journalists and advertisers. The app, which takes six-second videos and bets on a short attention span, has taken off so quickly that NowThis News, a mobile news service, has hired a Vine video journalist.

By hiring its first Vine journalist, NowThis News, a year-old network with an 18- to 34-year-old niche market, is betting that video news in Vine’s six-second micro-video loop will be as successful as Twitter’s 140-character text format. Their Vine journalist, Cody Johns, now commands more than 1 million followers on his Vine account.

Vine, which was acquired by Twitter in October 2012, lets users shoot six-second videos and share them on Vine, Twitter and Facebook. It has been seeing success with a steady increase in users, climbing the free app charts with an August overall app rank of No. 18, according to Onavo, an app analytics company. Vine says that its community numbered 40 million active users in August.

NowThis News uses Vine to put out political news, with Vines of Sen. John McCain’s position on Russia’s involvement in the Syrian situation.  Vine Journalist Johns, speaking on CNN Reliable Sources, said that NowThis News is working to get more politicians to do six-second Vines. “Vine is geared toward a young audience between ages 13 and 26. [They] need to be exposed to politics and Vine is the perfect medium for them,” Johns said of their targeted demographic.

And since just 5 percent of people younger than 30 closely follow news on Washington and politics, political journalists trying to reach such a demographic might want to invest in creating Vines.

Other news outlets are also finding Vine a useful news gathering and delivery tool. Meaghan Anselm of KSDK-TV in St. Louis says her newsroom uses Vine to find story ideas by searching local hashtags. KSDK-TV is also using Vine in its own marketing by showcasing newsroom personalities and behind-the-scenes news-gathering processes in a bid to gain viewership. “People think it is just a light-hearted, fun thing, but you can get serious content from [Vine],” Anselm says.

In addition to news organizations, Dunkin Donuts, Target, Samsung and Burt’s Bees are just some of the corporate users of Vine for their marketing purposes.

For journalists, PR professionals and marketers with an existing Twitter and Facebook presence and who are looking to more successfully reach a younger demographic more responsive to a micro-video content strategy, integration of Vine into their present social media mix could maximize Twitter and Facebook followers.

Though Vine is an app for Android and iOS, it integrates nicely with Twitter and Facebook, allowing for a useful role on those platforms and for both mobile and desktop viewing.

For NowThis News, the Vine’s six-second video format has proven more successful than its Twitter distribution, capturing 107,300 Vine followers compared to 23,250 on Twitter. And with Vine’s integration into its Twitter feed, NowThis News can leverage its Vine followers to help extend its Twitter reach. It can also better leverage Vine journalist Johns’ 1 million Vine followers to boost the following of the news organization itself. The Vine format has also proven more successful than its Instagram video strategy, where the news service has 53,000 followers.

How is your social media strategy evolving with a constantly changing social media landscape? Has adaptability been your policy when it comes to your social media strategy? Are you seeing a disparity in followers between your social platforms? What are your examples of cross-leveraging social media platforms to fight those disparities?

Key Media Training Skills For Public Relations Professionals

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012

According to TJ Walker of Media Training Worldwide, who recently led a PRSA webinar on Media Training for Public Relations Professionals, there are some key skills we need to know as PR professionals to help our clients prepare for a media interview. 

Walker says for every interview, your goal is to get your message across in the final story. But there are actually five possible outcomes:

  1. Interview, no quote
  2. Quoted out of context (and sounds racist, sexist, ageist, etc.)
  3. Quoted, but not your message
  4. Quoted and pretty much on message (sort of by accident)
  5. Quoted, word-for-word the message you wanted (and picked in advance)

In order to get to the preferred outcome (#5 above), you first must remember that you have no control over what the reporter will ask. However, there are three elements that you do have control over.

“So, what if a reporter rapid fires several questions at me?” Pick the question to reply to based on which one will let you get back to your message the quickest ~ TJ Walker, Media Training Worldwide.

 

How to look comfortable.  Your client can remember everything you’ve coached them on, including their key message. However, no one will remember if they look stiff or scared.  Walker says PR pros should never ever let their client do an interview without a video rehearsal. It doesn’t matter the quality of camera (You can use your cell phone, iPad, or whatever.) It’s just practice.  You can even shoot the video in the cab on the way to the interview, as long as your spokespeople see and hear themselves. Even for telephone or traditionally print media, Walker recommends video rehearsal as there are some things that can be heard even if not seen. And, besides, you can pause video to show “bad’ sound bites so the client can hear for themselves.

How to get a solid 30-second point / message across. While brainstorming (sitting around discussing what should be said) has its value, you must get into rehearsal mode as part of your interview prep. What you think you’re going to say goes out the window when the interview begins.  Walker advised that when brainstorming, you need to isolate every single message or idea—talking in paragraphs can’t be processed and the context may get cut. Think about what the reporter may ask, what the audience may want to know, and what you want to say, and then narrow that down to the top three. PR pros should not allow their client to do the interview until they’ve narrowed their focus to these three key points and can express them in 30-second sound bites.

How to answer interview questions. Interviews are not like a normal conversation.  Responses need to be kept positive, and never guess! If your client doesn’t know the answer, it’s okay to say that – and then bridge back to your three messages.

During the webinar, attendees were able to ask questions, and there was one regarding wardrobe choices that I found exceptionally noteworthy.  We ladies tend to think black makes us look slimmer, but Walker says on video black can actually make you look fat. If you can’t see where your body stop and arms begin, your body just blends together making you look wide! Totally makes sense but I’d never thought about it in those terms.

Do you have a media training experience you’d like to share with our readers? What media training tips can you add?