Posts Tagged ‘tressalynne’


What Public Relations Students Should Do During Summer Break

Monday, June 3rd, 2013
Flickr.com: QueensU

Flickr.com: QueensU

Those who were seniors this past year are now graduated and moved on, leaving room for the next class of future PR professionals to fill their shoes—to take next steps on the path of their PR student career.  So, what should they be doing during summer break? Listed below are a few items that came to my mind (but I’m hoping some of our PR pro friends will chime-in with additional tips):

  • Set short-term goals. For example, attend at least one professional industry networking event over the summer. Or, read industry blogs and/or articles and comment on at least one each week.
  • Set long-term goals, write them down and number them in order of importance. For example, attend at least one industry professional networking event per semester. And/or get involved with on-campus pre-professional organization (like PRSSA or AMA).
  • Work on your portfolio. Gather writing samples–or create some by volunteering to write a guest blog post, or better yet, start your own blog. Be sure to include any public relations or marketing plans you’ve created, press releases, anything written in AP Style, research papers, newspaper clippings, presentations, creative design samples, reference letters, special certifications, etc. If you haven’t yet created an online portfolio, do so. The earlier you begin, the more prepared you will be come graduation time. NOTE: If you are including any work that was done as part of a group, be sure to notate this and identify which part you actually did.
  • Practice your elevator speech. You should have a 30-second spiel that is memorable and opens a window to your personality, your passions and your mindset. Not a laundry list of skills but rather what you can offer to a potential employer. Practice OUT LOUD. Use your smartphone to record yourself so you can play it back and make improvements.
  • Clean-up and hone your online presence—including your social media accounts. Google yourself  (be sure to ‘hide personal results’ by clicking the globe in the upper right)–and don’t forget Bing and Yahoo!. If the first page results do not represent who you are, immediately begin digital damage control. This is even more important if you have a common name and can easily be confused with a dubious doppelgänger. Seek out and follow industry leaders so you can network and learn from the professionals, not just fellow students.
    • Not sure what “digital damage control” is? Here are some tips from CareerBuilder on CNN.com.
    • Don’t think employers are using the Web and social media to research job candidates? Read this from the Wall Street Journal.
  • PR professionals must view themselves as “brands”—it’s a very competitive industry. Your business cards, resume, online portfolios, etc. should present a cohesive message. Work on ensuring that all these match your “brand.”
  • Research agencies, organization, companies that you would like to intern with or work for.  Reach out to them and request an information interview. Face-to-face is best but Skype or Google+ Hangouts work, too. Ask what (coursework, degrees, activities, skill sets) they are looking for when hiring. Ask, given identical academic backgrounds, what makes some candidates standout above the rest.
  • If you have free time, volunteer at a local non-profit organization and offer to help with public relations, marketing, social media, blog content creation, special events. This is experience—it all counts!

What else should students (or young PR pros) be doing in preparation for their career?  If you are a student or recent graduate, what have you done (or are doing) to progress your career? We want to hear from you.

Gaining Insights – Following the 2011 PRSA International Conference

Friday, October 14th, 2011

Colleen Flood*

prsa-logoThe 2011 International PRSA Conference kicks off in Florida tomorrow through Tuesday, October 18th.  Will you be there? Join Johna Burke, senior vice president, BurrellesLuce, for a workshop on ROI and Storytelling in the Digital Age. And to help get you thinking about storytelling, read the October 2011 BurrellesLuce newsletter in our free resource library.

For those of us not attending this year, myself included, there are ways to experience the conference without being there in person. 

Here are just a few of the ways I plan to capitalize on what surely will be an educational week of professional development:

  • Twitter:  Follow the hashtag #PRSAICON to check out tweets from sessions Twitter users are attending.  There’s sure to be live tweeting.  I know the BurrellesLuce team of @gojohnab, @tressalynne, @cldegoede and @_laurenshapiro_ attending the conference will be tweeting under this hashtag.  You may also want to follow the Twitter handles of some of the conference’s speakers. I also set up a column in my BurrellesLuce social media monitoring tool (Engage121) to keep tabs on all these tweets.
  • ComPRehension Blog: This is the official blog of PRSA and will be updated with conferences blog posts, podcasts, interviews and other news related to the conference.
  • Flickr:  Another source I will check out is the 2011 PRSA International photo stream on Flickr to view event photos.
  • Facebook:  While their doesn’t appear to  be an official page setup for the conference, I still plan to monitor PRSA’s Facebook fan page for interesting tidbits, along with some of the local Florida chapters.

I look forward to “listening” to the conference from New Jersey…How are you going to make the most of your virtual, conference experience this year?

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*Bio: Colleen Flood has been a sales consultant with BurrellesLuce for over 12 years and is eager to become a more integrated part of the social-public relations community. She primarily handles agency relations in the New York and New Jersey metro-area. She is not only passionate about work, but also about family, friends, and the Jersey Shore. Twitter: @cgflood LinkedIn: Colleen Flood Facebook: BurrellesLuce 

Is Twitter “Media?”

Monday, July 20th, 2009

If you’re on Twitter, you know that it’s not only a wonderful way to meet and network with other PR/MarComm professionals, but it’s a great source of news stories – especially breaking news. 

You’re also probably aware that hundreds of news stories broke first on Twitter; for example, the US Airways plane going down in the Hudson River, the earthquake in China, Iran’s post-election protests, Michael Jackson’s death, and just the other day the bombing in Jakarta.

My BurrellesLuce colleagues and I have read  a number of blog posts and stories about what this means for mainstream (traditional) news outlets. Per one 2549338029_791d5674f9.jpgrecent story, “The buttresses of old media institutions, from print to television, are under stress from the advertising downturn, but social media is thriving as the world flocks to the likes of Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.”

There’s been some scuttlebutt lately about whether this is a good thing or not. One post went as far as to say “Goodbye CNN-crawl, hello Twitter.” 

I’m not sure I’m ready to write-off CNN or other traditional news outlets just yet – after all, as soon as the news broke on Twitter, the first thing I did was tune in to CNN (or TMZ in the case of Michael Jackson) to see if there was journalistic confirmation of these reports. 

Perhaps I’m not as forward-thinking as some, but the St. Louis Social Media Report seems to agree with me – there is room for both Twitter and traditional news outlets as they both bring forth a distinctive and practical point of view.

Do you think Twitter or other social media will replace traditional media?  I look forward to the conversation.

Some Tweet Stats For Communicators

Monday, June 22nd, 2009

If you are like a lot of people, you are having debates about the value of Twitter and the level of engagement needed as part of your communications strategy. At the AMEC Measurement Summit in Berlin, Germany I had the johnaberlin.jpgpleasure of meeting Dr. Nick Koudas, CEO of Sysomos, who recently conducted some analysis of Twitter “An In-Depth Look Inside the Twitter World.”  

The study reveals some fascinating data about demographic and keyword trends to consider when developing your strategy and offers some support for engagement. The Sysomos study doesn’t define the “sphere of influence,” the holy grail I believe we need to fully leverage social media efforts, it definitely provides a step in the right direction. The research should help make the communication role easier since success is more likely when we have a good baseline of knowledge. With this information your organization can make the most impact in social media.

While in Berlin I had the pleasure of conducting a video interview with Dr. Koudas. The audio isn’t great, but for those of you interested he shares some insights from the study.

One last personal note: Based on this study I’m proud to say BurrellesLuce tweeters (@gail_nelson, @valeriesimon, @dfriez, @tressalynne, and @gojohnab) are above average in most areas.

Free Press Release Distribution Services

Monday, March 9th, 2009

free-clipart.jpgI was reading a recent blog post by @journalistics headlined “60+ Free Press Release Distribution Services…Really?” It caught my eye because I’ve recently read several other posts with link after link to these “free” services and thought the same thing – “Really?!” 

In this economy, companies are cutting back and may think that they can cut the PR budget (City of Chicago comes to mind) but is this really feasible? I understand the allure of these sites, but buyer beware – some of these free services hard-sell paid upgrades. Don’t get me wrong, these sites definitely have some good points, like giving you or your client instant search engine visibility.  If that is your goal, then it’s probably a great choice; and, while your client may be happy with increased web visibility, the rest of us know there’s way more to it than that! Actually, some of our BurrellesLuce Media Contacts subscribers tell me that they occasionally use a variety of these in addition to their targeted media list distribution. 

As a matter of fact, in the blog post (referenced above), @journalistics states “…if you’re serious about using a press release as a media relations tool, use a proven distribution channel to get the word out. If the press release doesn’t merit distribution on a mainstream service, consider not sending the release out at all. You’ll do more harm than good by sending out PR spam.”

What do you think – should you use a proven distribution channel or just go for the freebies, or a combination thereof?

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