Posts Tagged ‘Spanish’


Newspaper Apps Changing the Way Audiences Consume News

Tuesday, September 21st, 2010

Lauren Shapiro* 

Rumors of iNewspaper, the new iPad application, have begun taking center stage with Internet chatterboxes. With its new app, Apple would create digital versions of publications by selling subscriptions on behalf of the publishers (and taking a cut of the profit, for sure!). However, the iPad friendly newspaper is not a new idea by any means.

Flickr Image Source: Byrion (Byrion Smith)

Flickr Image Source: Byrion (Byrion Smith)

The biggest names in publishing have already established themselves on the iPad including the New York Times, BBC News, Wall Street Journal and AP News. Some downloads, such as the Wall Street Journal, are even free; however for access to exclusive content, a subscription purchase is required. According to PCWorld.com, WSJ users can even create a custom “watch list” of their stocks and funds.  For BBC iPad readers, you can view articles in several languages including Spanish, Russian and Arabic. But, the real niche of online news subscriptions is the customization options. BBC News allows users to personalize the content they view based on interest. While offline, the application will search and locate stories for the next time you turn your iPad on.

Will the iPad subscription based model help drive revenue to electronic publications? The answer is, probably, yes – especially as free views of online articles become more limited by publishers. But the momentum and accessibility of online publications will likely urge readers away from the classic hard copy publication (e.g., commuters who rely on a good paper to read while taking a bus or train to work).

The trend toward an iNewspaper product is a sign of the times as the world becomes more reliant on the Internet than ever. Apple seems to have found itself at the forefront of this technology and has placed itself comfortably in the middle (as publishers learn how to better monetize their content) likely allowing Apple to earn quite a few pretty pennies in the meantime.

As a communications professional, do you think that e-publications will ever take the strength away from hard copy publications? How do you think this will impact your public relations, marketing, and advertising efforts? Please share your thoughts with me and the readers of BurrellesLuce Fresh Ideas. 

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*Bio: Soon after graduating from the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, in 2006 with a B.A. in communication and a B.S. in business/marketing, I joined the BurrellesLuce client services team. In 2008, I completed my master’s degree in corporate and organizational communications and now serve as Director of Client Services. I am passionate about researching and understanding the role of email in shaping relationships from a client relation/service standpoint as well as how miscommunication occurs within email, which was the topic of my thesis. Through my posts on Fresh Ideas, I hope to educate and stimulate thoughtful discussions about corporate communications and client relations, further my own knowledge on this subject area, as well as continue to hone my skills as a communicator. Twitter: @_LaurenShapiro_ LinkedIn: laurenrshapiro Facebook: BurrellesLuce

Are You Shifting Marketing and PR Plans Based on Hispanic Demographic Trends?

Wednesday, May 26th, 2010

by Colleen Flood*

Hola, como estan todos?  Es un placer de estar aqui. Estan todos disfrutando la conferencia? 

This is similiar to how David Henry, founder and president of Telenoticias and co-author of Hispanic Marketing and Public Relations: Understanding and Targeting America’s Largest Minority, started the session “A Sleeping Giant” at the PRSA Counselors Academy Conference, which BurrellesLuce sponsored, this past weekend. Henry switched back to communicating in English and asked if we understood what he had just said. Only one or two hands went up in the group. He then related this to what Hispanics understand when they are marketed to in English.

The current marketplace in the U.S. is comprised of a diverse group. There has been boom over the past few years and by 2050, it is estimated that 30 percent of the population will be Hispanic. This is a population with a purchasing power that is progressing 50 percent faster than non-Hispanic groups. (In fact, BurrellesLuce first began writing about these trends in a 2007 newsletter entitled, “Top Five Tips for Reaching the Growing Hispanic Market.”)

This is the “sleeping giant,” according to Henry, since Hispanics seem to be more of a brand-loyal and relationship-driven community. Even though U.S. Hispanics speak English, in the home many of them are only speaking Spanish and are making buying decisions and vacation choices in a family setting. Henry explained that not enough companies include Hispanic outreach as a core part of their PR and marketing plans. If we are not communicating in Spanish or speaking to their values how are they interpreting what they will purchase? 

Henry also insists that Hispanic consumers need to be engaged via online and social media. They are the fastest growing in terms of online usage in the U.S. and to dispel any myths, Henry explained that 82 percent of Hispanics do have computers.  Fifty-eight percent of the total Hispanic population is online and 55 percent are using Spanish language sites – this is up 41 percent according to Henry. Companies who engage with Hispanics will have success – social media is perfect for the Hispanic market.

Henry offered some ways to reach Hispanic audiences:

  • Adapt to your market. Research the culture and garner an understanding before trying to market it. (This also applies to other consumer groups and niche markets as well.)
  • Take a bilingual approach. This will help to send a consistent, effective message.
  • Understand core values.  The family dynamic plays an important role in purchasing decisions, among other values.
  • Get involved in the community. Partner and communicate with Hispanic organizations.
  • Employ a fluent Spanish language spokesperson. Some larger agencies even have dedicated teams.  Just because you know some Spanish, does not mean you know the Hispanic market or their communication preferences.

How are you marketing en Espanol? What about in other languages or to other non-English speaking groups or niche communities? What are some of your tips for communicating and marketing to an increasing diverse group of influencers and constituents?

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*Bio: Colleen Flood has been a sales consultant with BurrellesLuce for over 12 years and is eager to become a more integrated part of the social-public relations community. She primarily handles agency relations in the New York and New Jersey metro-area. She is not only passionate about work, but also about family, friends, and the Jersey Shore. Twitter: @cgflood LinkedIn: Colleen Flood Facebook: BurrellesLuce