Posts Tagged ‘news’


BurrellesLuce Complimentary Webinar: Leveraging Breaking News to Boost Your Brand

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

BurrellesLuce Complimentary Webinar w/ Todd Hartley - Leveraging Breaking News to Boost Your BrandBurrellesLuce Complimentary Webinar: Leveraging Breaking News to Boost Your Brand

Register Now!

When: Monday, September 24, 2012

Time: Noon EDT

When news breaks in your industry, what should you do? How do you own the conversation, promote your expert, and develop business relationships that convert to revenue?

Join BurrellesLuce and Todd Hartley, CEO of WireBuzz for this informative 60-minute webcast, “Leveraging Breaking News to Boost Your Brand.”

During the webcast you will:

  • Learn tricks to maximize breaking news opportunities by combining a press release with a rapid-response video.
  • Learn how to optimize social media engagement and search results for breaking news.
  • See case studies implementing this strategy.

And much more…

Register Now!

Moderator: Johna Burke, senior vice president, marketing, BurrellesLuce

Space is limited. Sign up now for this free webinar, “Leveraging Breaking News to Boost Your Brand.” If we are unable to accept your registration, an on-demand presentation will be available for review after the event at www.burrellesluce.com.

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Todd Hartley (@TheToddHartley), CEO of WireBuzz, has spearheaded digital marketing campaigns for seven of the largest national talk shows and created the first video medical encylopedia on the internet. His agency, WireBuzz, specializes in developing fast video content production for press releases, search engine optimization, and customer lead generation.

In PR and the Media: August 13, 2012

Monday, August 13th, 2012

Review: What’s the Best News Monitoring Service? (Keybridge Communications)
Keybridge Communications, a DC-based public relations firm specializing in writing, media placement, and design, dishes on their experience with various news monitoring services and why BurrellesLuce has the best products and service.  

Pinterest Opens Its Doors to the Public. Now What?
Social media star of the moment Pinterest led the news yesterday by announcing that it has officially made the transition from an invitation-only site to one that is open to all interested individuals and businesses. In other words, business owners and PR pros no longer have a legitimate excuse for ignoring this must-have tool.” (PRNewser/Mediabistro)

JC Penney Looks to Newspapers in Revamped Marketing Push
“In the wake of bleak second-quarter results, JC Penney says it is shifting its marketing from brand building to business building. During a meeting with analysts to discuss second-quarter results, CEO Ron Johnson detailed the marketing shifts that have taken place since its chief marketer and merchandiser, President Michael Francis, abruptly departed after just eight months. JC Penney “went dark” in mid-June — the same time Mr. Francis departed — turning off TV ads, canceling the July catalog that was already printed and scrapping July newspaper inserts, Mr. Johnson said.” (Adage)

In Self-Imposed Alternative to SOPA, Google Will Ding Repeat Copyright Offenders in Search Results
“Google said today that it will use the number of copyright removal notices filed against a certain domain as a signal in its search results. This is a sort of voluntary alternative to the infamous SOPA and PIPA legislation, which would have required ISPs and search engines to block access to sites accused of copyright infringement.” (AllThingsD)

Mobile Aids Growth of Traditional Media

Friday, June 29th, 2012

Despite what some proponents contend, traditional media is not dead. In truth – it’s not even on life support.  Sure, The Media has changed in scope (with the biggest decline in outlets occurring in 2009), but certainly not in respect to relevancy, and absolutely NOT in how news consumers access content and satiate their growing appetite.

Why do I think so?  “A mounting body of evidence finds that the spread of mobile technNot seeing all of your media coverage is like looking at the grand canyon through a strawology is adding to news consumption, strengthening the appeal of traditional news brands and even boosting reading of long-form journalism,” confirms The PEW Research Center in its State of the News Media 2012.

The PEW study shows, “27 percent of the population now gets news on mobile devices. And these mobile news consumers are even more likely to turn to news organizations directly, through apps and homepages, rather than search or recommendations – strengthening the bond with traditional brands.” 

Our changing media consumption habits are augmenting, not diminishing, the importance of traditional media. Largely in part to how today’s audiences access The Media across multiple platforms and channels rather than simply swapping one media type for the other.

 The study goes on to cite the comScore whitepaper on Digital Omnivores: How Tablets, Smartphones and Connected Devices are Changing U.S. Digital Media Consumption Habits, quoting, “The evidence also suggests mobile is adding to, rather than replacing, people’s news consumption. Data tracking people’s behavior, for instance, find mobile devices increased traffic on major newspaper websites by an average of 9%.”

What’s even more interesting is that mobile users tend to favor traditional media values even when using digital platforms to access the content. For example, “The data also found that the reputation or brand of a news organization, a very traditional idea, is the most important factor in determining where consumers go for news, and that is even truer for mobile devices than on laptops or desktops,” according to Amy Mitchell and Tom Rosenstiel of the Project for Excellence in Journalism, and Leah Christian of the Pew Research Center in Mobile Devices and News Consumption: Some Good Signs for Journalism. 

Despite the growth of social media, the brand reputation of traditional media (which also has a social ecosystem) has more influence on audiences – exceeding shares on social networks, including Facebook and Twitter, and even those made by friends.

So, the next time you read a tweet or hear about the demise of traditional media, try to put it in perspective and remember that unless you are seeing your coverage from ALL types of media, you won’t have an accurate representation of how your messages are playing out and influencing ALL of your audiences. While I recommend stakeholder targeting related to your goals and initiatives, all forms of an outlet should be part of your sample or you are skewing your data and results of a high level of integrity based on sampling. Ironically, in an effort to be trendy, some organizations focus solely on digital. However a digital focus alone, that doesn’t include traditional media, is blindingly misleading and can be equated to looking at the Grand Canyon through a straw. Sure, it’s pretty, but you miss more than you see!

In PR and the Media: June 19, 2012

Tuesday, June 19th, 2012

A round-up of what’s trending in PR and the Media.

Google sees ‘alarming’ level of government censorship “Web giant says that in the past six months it received more than 1,000 requests from government officials for the removal of content. It complied with more than half of them.” (CNET News)

 

Post-hack, companies fire back with their own attacks “According to a new report, some companies that have fallen victim to hacking attacks have gone as far as hiring security firms to hack back.” (CNET News)

 

Apple Gives Podcasts a Gentle Push Out of iTunes “So why have podcasts disappeared from the new version of iTunes that Apple started showing to developers this week? Because Apple plans to give the recordings their own digital turf.” (AllThingsD)

 

As Facebook Rolls Out Ad Options, Retailers Pass “Facebook has been unveiling more options for companies to advertise through the social media site. However, Reuters reports today that many businesses have been eschewing paid options to do what they can to promote their biz for free.” (AllFacebook) 

Career Building Tips for Sports PR and General Public Relations from Rich Dalrymple

Wednesday, April 25th, 2012
Katie Levy, Southeast Missouri State University

Katie Levy, from Southeast Missouri State University PRSSA Chapter, tried on Rich Dalrymple's Super Bowl Championship ring exclaiming, "It's prettier than an engagement ring!"

Rich Dalrymple, Dallas Cowboys spokesperson and vice president of public relations and communications, recently spoke to eager PR students at the PRSSA Regional Conference in Nashville, Tennessee. In an earlier post, I shared a typical week in the life of Dallas Cowboys public relations.

Below are some of the tips Dalrymple offered during his presentation. While some suggestions are relative to PR students seeking a career in sports communications, others are timeless and can be applied to anyone working in PR.

1. Study the careers of other public relations professionals. Knowing where other people have been can help you figure out where you want to go with your career.

2. Hone your writing skills. “If you can write, you can do any job,” explained Dalrymple. He believes this is true as writing teaches you how to organize your thoughts, organize your ideas, and structure them in a way that others can understand. This is especially true in public relations. You can write speeches for the CEO, communicate messages to stockholders, explain policies to employees, etc.  If you can write and communicate well, you are able to organize other aspects of your life and business, too.

3. Work at your university’s communications office, university sports department, official events, etc. If you can’t do that, then find an off-campus job as an undergrad. You need real-world experience BEFORE your senior year. I was glad to hear him reinforce this as I’ve been advising PR students that if they’ve waited until their senior year to begin job searching and networking, then they’re already behind the eight ball!

4. Find a mentor. There is no substitute for shadowing pros and riding their coattails, so to speak. If you’re lucky enough to “find Superman,” Dalrymple said, hold onto his cape and you may find yourself taken to heights you’ve never been and maybe never could have on your own.  He uses himself as an example, saying that he hung onto one of his early bosses and mentor, making him in 1990 the youngest NFL PR guy at the age of 30! He did admit that luck also helps.

5. Find what you do well. Put yourself in a position to showcase those skills and attributes and a positive impression.  Dalrymple also stressed that you shouldn’t be afraid to start small—it’s okay if your first job(s) are not “sexy.” Find the decision-makers and get to know them and what they like. Dalrymple went on to say that so much of what you learn in public relations crosses over to advertising, marketing, sales, and other communications disciplines.  Yes, he said PR is sales – you’re selling ideas, strategies, views, concepts.

6. Read a newspaper every day. Online or in print doesn’t really matter, but read ALL the sections – not just sports, or just local, or wherever your interest lies. Read every section, even international. You need to see big picture of the news and world to know how and where you fit. 

7.  Figure out your dream job. Start mapping a path to get you there. He said “fantasize, and then strategize.”

What PR career building tips would you add to the list? Please share your thoughts with the readers of BurrellesLuce Fresh Ideas by leaving a comment below.