Posts Tagged ‘audience’


This Week’s Shot of Fresh: Statues, Socialocity, The Loop, Compelling Content, Groundhog Day, Advocados, Quoting Accurately, and Lawyer Up

Friday, February 7th, 2014
Squared Splash by flickr user derekGavey used under CC BY

Squared Splash by flickr user derekGavey used under CC BY

It’s been a busy two weeks here at Fresh Ideas. This week’s Shot of Fresh rounds up our Fresh Ideas content for the past two weeks:

Get Thee to a Lawyer: What You Need to Know About Canada’s New Anti-Spam Law

Almost every commercial email falls under purview of this law, so if you have affiliates, headquarters, clients, or leads in Canada, there’s a lot to do before July 1.

Issuing Citations: How to Quote Wisely and Accurately

Friends don’t let friends misquote. Misquotes shift the focus from your message to your mistake – here are some tips to quote someone accurately.

Jargonology Episode 3: Advocado

Don’t be an advocado – that’s what fact-checking is for. Don’t know what that means? Check out the video for your latest jargon jar addition.

Five PR Takeaways From Groundhog Day

Groundhog Day is still just once a year, but PR lessons from the movie are forever.

How to Build a Brand Using Compelling Content

It’s the age of content marketing but that content needs to be compelling and contagious in order add to the brand. Check out the three E’s of contagious content.

The Loop: A 360° Approach to Public Relations – Registration Now Open

Know a PR student? Then they should attend The Loop, a PRSSA conference in downtown Chicago early next month. Plus, our own Tressa Robbins is a speaker.

Art Discourse, or Community PR?

When an ultra-lifelike, nearly naked statue of a sleepwalking man appears on the Wellesley College campus (a women’s college), is it PR stunt, or glaring misread of the audience?

Jargonology Episode 4: The Story of Socialocity

We’ve all witnessed socialocity firsthand – the rapid-fire pace at which an offensive tweet is shared, the traffic and comments a fan base can bring – and let’s face it: We all want to be on socialocity’s good side, even if it means performing emergency hashtagectomies, quarantining our influenzers, or reforming advocados.

Art Discourse, or Community PR?

Thursday, February 6th, 2014

The latest art installation at Wellesley College is a prime example of PR and art going hand in hand. On Monday, the art piece Sleepwalker by Tony Matelli made its appearance on a green space off the side of the campus’s main (and only) road, and Wednesday it became a national story. Sleepwalker is a very real looking statue of a man, naked except for some underwear, arms outstretched, walking with his eyes closed in what appears to be a deep sleep. The piece is part of an exhibit of Matelli’s work.

Wellesley is a women’s college, and this has predictably caused a stir on campus. I say “predictably” because I’m a Wellesley alumna, and I know firsthand that almost everything incites debate on campus (in my opinion, one of the virtues of the school). But unlike most campus debates, this one sparked national attention, when students petitioned to have the statue removed because it “became a source of apprehension, fear, and triggering thoughts” for some students.

Matelli has a similar piece, also called Sleepwalker, which features a nearly naked sleepwalking woman. Again, Wellesley is a women’s college; presumably, anyone planning the exhibit would realize that students might not receive a creepy, lifelike statue of a nearly naked sleepwalking man too well. Placing a naked sleepwalking woman outside would not have caused such a stir with students – or in the press – yet it would still have opened a discourse that “[muddles] the line between what we expect to be inside (art) and what we expect to be outside (life),” which Lisa Fischman, Ruth Gordon Shapiro ’37 Director of the Davis Museum at Wellesley, stated as being one of the aims of the placement of the piece.

And that placement has certainly generated tons of discourse in the media: the story is in, among other outlets, The Washington Post, The Huffington Post, Associated Press, and even on Buzzfeed.

The selection and placement of the work of art comes down to knowing your audience, but this means more than just segmenting into demographics. The immediate audience at Wellesley is women ages 18 to 24, and while they fall into the same demographic, the women at Wellesley are very diverse in background and thinking, and that demographic grouping is all but meaningless.

Fischman writes that “As the best art does, Tony Matelli’s work provokes open dialogue, and discourse is at the core of education.” While the art department may have had the purest of intentions when placing the statue in a high-traffic area, surely organizers must have realized not only the effect the statue would have, but also, if they had the choice of statues, that the female sleepwalker would likely suit the audience far better, and elicit the kind of dialogue the museum hoped for.

As far as I know, Wellesley doesn’t do publicity “stunts,” so assuming that to still hold, what started out as a small art installation has turned into a glaring audience misread. While “know your audience” has become almost cliché as rule number one in PR (and just about everything else), this situation makes clear that it’s rule number one for a reason.

Content and Corporate Storytelling: Lessons From Coca-Cola Part 1

Monday, November 4th, 2013
By Flickr user Bev Goodwin

By Flickr user Bev Goodwin

In the dawning age of content marketing, it’s up to PR professionals to make that content work for them, but leveraging that content and making it work for your organization is an unmapped challenge.  At last month’s PRSA International Conference, Mallory Perkins, a social media analyst at Coca-Cola, shared how she and her team launched Coca-Cola Journey, the organization’s content blog, grew a massive following and created an online community.

Coca-Cola Journey launched in November, 2012, as Coca-Cola’s response to the recent heavy shift in communications. The organization realized that digital consumers are strong influencers with the ability to respond, shape, and take part in conversations with companies and the products they value, using tools like social media, video, and online forums. Coca-Cola seized the opportunity for consumers and companies to have one-on-one conversations in a meaningful way, which Perkins stressed was key to earning relevance and success in business and digital arenas.

Coca-Cola Journey was launched with several goals in mind: to be a hub for the company’s content; to share stories and connect with consumers; to provoke, inspire, and engage the Coca-Cola community; to prompt action of some kind, and to cultivate a deeper level of brand loyalty, ultimately supporting business growth.

The site was imagined not as a website or blog, but as an e-magazine. Its goal was to be the digital heart and soul of the company, and reflect in each story the brand’s values. Stories are targeted to be consumer-facing stories with a “behind-the-bottle feel.”

The key behind the site’s success? Great content, says Perkins. Coca-Cola created an internal editorial team and a group of freelancers solely focused on creating original stories. How does one create great content? Start by knowing your audience. Coca-Cola prioritized their audience thusly: existing consumers and fans, potential customers, investors, partners, media, and critics.

“Make sure your content captures the essence of your brand,” advises Perkins, and ensure the type of content you create and how you communicate with your audience varies with company values and different product lines. The reason for Coca-Cola Journey’s launch was to engage with consumers and target content to what the data shows they like. Investors and media are still important audiences to consider, so ensure they have the information they need, but craft a separate section for their content that’s easily accessible.

Check back tomorrow for the guidelines Perkins and her team folloow to ensure they’re crafting the most relevant, reader- and brand-friendly content.

In PR and the Media: June 18, 2012

Monday, June 18th, 2012

A round-up of what’s trending in PR and the Media.

Hearst Claims Nearly 2000% Increase in Mobile Traffic in a Year “Touting growth in its mobilized audience, the Hearst Digital Media group says traffic coming from devices to its portfolio of sites has grown from 5% in April 2011 to 19% in 2012. That 2000% increase in mobile access is not spread consistently across all platforms, however.” (minonline)

 

The Season of Broadcast Disconnect “With cable’s vampires, stage moms, and methheads, this could be nets’ worst summer yet.” (Adweek)

 

Nielsen Adds iPad Data, Lowers Growth Forecast “Nielsen CFO Brian West just reported the company has a measurement system to capture iPad and other tablet usage that is being tested by large media companies.” (MediaPost)

 

Circulation Report: Analysis of Latest Figures from the ABC “the FAS-FAX circulation report, which reflects topline numbers for the six months ending March 31, shows that digital circulation made up an average of 14.2 percent of all news publishers’ counted products, up from 8.66 percent in March 2011.” (Editor and Publisher)

PRSA-NCC Members Told Social Media is ‘Where We Live Today’

Friday, May 11th, 2012

This post first appeared on Capitol Communicator 5.11.12 and is cross-posted with permission. 

PRSA-NCC session on Social Media

Shown in the picture, (l to r) Chris Brooks, Julie A. Weckerlein, Cappy Surette, Jennifer Mitchell and Gloria Huang. The session was moderated by Debbie Friez, vice president, BurrellesLuce.)

Five communicators made the case that social media is “where we live today” during a May 10 professional development session conducted by the Public Relations Society of America’s National Capital Chapter (PRSA-NCC).

The session at the Navy Memorial, “Social Media Tips and Success Stories for PR Pros,” featured Cappy Surette, director of public relations at U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery; Chris Brooks, manager of social engagement at Hilton Worldwide; Julie A. Weckerlein, public affairs specialist at U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Gloria Huang, senior social engagement specialist at the American Red Cross; and, Jennifer Mitchell, director of social media at BRG Communications. The session was moderated by Debbie Friez, vice president, BurrellesLuce.

Social media allows you to reach “a wider and more diverse audience than we can through the use of traditional media alone,” said Surrette. He and the other panelists said social media provides a great opportunity to attract advocates you may never have considered. These advocates, it was noted, can come to your aid when your organization is being challenged.

Brooks, who said his job at Hilton Worldwide is to put “heads in beds,” added social media allows you to build up a “community of supporters” in advance of a problem. He added , to be successful, you should consider multiple channels – such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Flickr. During his presentation, Brooks also offered these two observations: Approach social media in an organized manner and remember that “measurement is key.”

Regarding social media, Weckerlein told seminar attendees, “don’t be afraid to take calculated risks,” but use the “same voice” and present the “same message.” She also presented a case history from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) showinghow cost effective social media can be for an organization. The real cost of the CDC campaign based on the Zombie Apocalypse preparedness relating it to hurricane preparedness was $87.00, but the campaign generated more than three million dollars in estimated marketing value.

In her presentation, Huang said, “you don’t have a choice on whether to do social media, the question is how well you do it.” She offered the followed social media principles employed by the American Red Cross: Be accurate, be relevant, be considerate, be transparent, be human and be compassionate.

Mitchell stated organizations do well in social media when they look beyond their own organization. As an example, she said that social media allows you to ask questions to your target audience to get them involved with your organization. In short, she said, personal relationships are more important than ever, so encourage your target audiences to interact with you. Content is king, and she reminded the audience, “People spread (share) awesome content. They don’t spread mediocre content. However, Mitchel also offered an observation that put social media into perspective: It’s an addition to, not a replacement for, “old” communications platforms.

The bottom line, according to Surrette, is that “You can’t control the sea of public opinion, but (using social media) you can at least navigate it.”

***

Phil Rabin has covered trends in communications for more than two decades for a number of media outlets. Currently, he is editor of Capitol Communicator, www.capitolcommunicator.com, an online resource working to bringing together communications professionals who influence and educate the Mid-Atlantic region by providing news, trends, education and opportunities for networking. Phil also is Vice President of West Glen Communications, www.westglen.com, and is a member of the Public Relations Society of America.