Red State vs. Blue State: The Great Twitter Divide

February 20th, 2009
by BurrellesLuce Insider

Gail Nelson
lovehate.jpgAs Kevin Dugan says in his recent post, microblogging site Twitter inspires a lot of passion. Twitter addicts are pitted against Twitter haters. And some people just don’t know what to make of Twitter.

Also this week, the social media haves and have-nots battled it out in the PR and marketing blogs. Jeremiah Owyang of Forrester weighed in on a discussion originating at Cece’s blog  as to whether a PR firm requires a high-profile, branded social media presence to legitimately advise its client. As of this morning, these two posts have attracted 90 comments.

From those who attend and ask questions at our webinars and download BurellesLuce newsletters and white papers, we know that many PR pros are still in the early stages of social media engagement.  My reaction to these heated discussions is that one-size-fit-all thinking – nobody should Twitter, everyone must have a big social media footprint – is very similar to Red State/Blue State thinking. Polarization doesn’t serve our country well all the time, and it’s probably not the best course for PR professionals. Experimentation with new channels is a good thing, but I think PR pros shine when they root their plans – whether for their clients and their own firms — in audience research and good communication strategy. What is your experience?

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2 Responses to “Red State vs. Blue State: The Great Twitter Divide”

  1. Hi Gail, thanks for your post regarding the discussion over a PR firm’s competency in social media. While most of the discussion has been over Twitter or “one-size-fit-all” strategy, I believe that a strategy has to be developed based on one’s objectives. My curiousity as to which firms had what type of social media presence wasn’t meant to say that PR firms should have a presence on all of these outlets.

    With that said, I do believe some familiarity with these “tools” is important when creating a strategy on behalf of a client.

    Thanks,
    Cece

  2. Gail Nelson says:

    Hi Cece,

    Thanks for your comments. Sounds like you are choosing the sensible middle ground.

    Best,
    Gail

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